Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated August 20, 2014)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the NewLivingTranslation.com site where the scripture will be displayed in the plain English of the NLT Bible.


August 3 – Comfort in Times of Trouble
Alternate Title – Does Anyone Care?

Bible Lesson: 2 Corinthians 1:3-11  

What we shall learn from this scripture:

Often times, a person has to endure hardship and pain in order to be able to comfort someone else going through the same type difficulty. Life is tough and full of problems; many of which are inescapable. God allows us to go through hard times in order to learn from the experience, as He did with Paul (2 Cor 1:8). The Lord is more interested in changing us, and how we meet the challenges of life, than to simply change or fix the challenges themselves. He wants us to learn to depend on Him in our time of need, as He did with Paul (2 Cor 1:9). Our trying times and emotionally difficult experiences can better equip us to comfort others in times of trouble (2 Cor 1:4).

The Lord wants us to help each other in times of need. All one has to do is to read Matthew 25:34-46 to understand this clearly.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
2 Corinthians 1:3-11
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




August 10 – Forgiveness and Restoration
Alternate Title – Restored Relationships

Bible Lesson: 2 Corinthians 1:23-24 ; 2 Corinthians 2:1-11

What we shall learn from this scripture:

Background: To understand what is going on in the reference scripture, it would be better to review some background. Previously (before his tenure in Ephesus), Paul had stayed in Corinth for around 18 months where he provided teaching and advice to the new believers. Later, while he was living in Ephesus, he wrote 1_Corinthians and sent it to Corinth by Timothy (1 Cor 4:17). This letter included substantial tough love-criticism and rebuke for the church in Corinth. Two examples are: 1 Cor 4:10 and 1 Cor 5:1. This letter was not well-received by some members of the church which resulted in considerable criticism of Paul by those members. This criticism boiled over when he made his first visit to Corinth while he lived in Ephesus.

Lesson: While living in Ephesus, Paul had originally planned to visit the Christians in Corinth twice, to give them a double blessing (2 Cor 1:15-16). But, he changed his plans (2 Cor 1:17) and decided not to visit the second time. Apparently, his first trip there had been problematic and some discord arose which hurt his spirit and humiliated him. The man who had insulted him (2 Cor 2:5) and was a source for the discord, had been reprimanded and his actions were opposed by the majority.

After Paul returned to Ephesus in distress, he was prompted to write a "severe letter" to them (2 Cor 7:8) which was delivered by Titus. This letter is not recorded in the Bible. Paul wanted to avoid a repeat of the discord and spare them his rebuke (2 Cor 1:23), so he cancelled the second trip to Corinth. Later, Titus reported to him that the "severe letter" had resulted in causing a more encouraging situation in the Corinth Church. This inspired Paul to write the 2_Corinthians letter and send it to them by Titus.

Today's application: Some people only attend worship services, have made very few friends in the church, and never go to church meetings. As a result, they are unaware of much of the conflict and disagreement which may propagate within the congregation. However, churches are made up of mostly ordinary people (not saints), and where there are significant numbers of people, there will be disputes and disagreements.

These disputes can become heated and cause an internal division within the church. Unfortunately, this discord has sometimes gotten so serious, the church body will split, with one faction leaving and starting their own church. Many times, this happens when part of the church becomes very dissatisfied with the pastor, and seeks to have him dismissed. Verbal insults and accusations can be directed at the Pastor in an inconsiderate and unchristian manner. Financial matters, the worship music, and even building projects can be other sources of dispute and disagreement.

Regardless of the root cause of the disputes, Members who witness such disagreements within the church, can become not only disillusioned with that particular church (or some individuals within the congregation), but can become disillusioned with the whole Christianity process and quit going to church altogether. When that happens, the church is failing to do as Jesus instructed, and falling into the trap set by Satan (2 Cor 2:11).

Paul's lesson to us, in the reference scripture, is that it is alright to reprimand a person who has said unchristian things, but he (or she) should also be forgiven. Reaffirm love for them so that they are not pushed out of the church altogether. This is sometimes not easy to do, but since Jesus died on the cross so we could have forgiveness and salvation, surely we can forgive our neighbors of their shortcomings. Paul's willingness to forgive the man who humiliated him is a good example of how we should be.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
2 Corinthians 1:23-24
and 2 Corinthians 2:1-11. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




August 17 – Treasure in Clay Jars
Alternate Title – Down But Not Out

Bible Lesson: 2 Corinthians 4:1-15   For the alternate title - 2 Corinthians 4:2-15

What we shall learn from this scripture:

When Paul wrote this part of his letter, he wanted the reader to understand he (and others like him) are human and, consequently, subject to many temptations, dangers, and troubles (2 Cor 4:11-12). They hold the knowledge of the truth and good news of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, in their human bodies. They are not themselves superhuman, and are like clay pots which could easily fail under pressure and hardship. But God's great power gives them the willpower and strength (2 Cor 4:7) to continue to spread the Good News in the face of all sorts of difficulty (2 Cor 4:8-9).

Accomplishing the new salvation gave purpose to Jesus' suffering and death on the cross. He suffered for us so we could be saved. Paul suffered, in sympathy with Jesus' suffering (2 Cor 4:10), so others could have knowledge of the new salvation. Then, they all could, together, have the resurrected eternal life (2 Cor 4:14) promised in the good news. Paul (and other leaders like him) already had accepted the new salvation, and would therefore receive the resurrection. Therefore, their efforts to spread the good news was for others (2 Cor 4:15) and so God would receive more glory.


The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
2 Corinthians 4:1-15
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




August 24 – An Appeal for Reconciliation
Alternate Title – Addressing Tensions

Bible Lesson: 2 Corinthians 6:1-13 ; 2 Corinthians 7:1-4

What we shall learn from this scripture:

All of us have been in some type of dispute with someone else. Perhaps it was a misunderstanding, or just a difference of opinion. Some good friendships have been ruin because one person didn't understand completely the motives behind another person's words or actions. To make matters worse, some people are so stubborn or prideful; they refuse to attempt to resolve a dispute by going to the other person in a humble manner.

It is no secret, Paul's criticism of some actions of the members of the church in Corinth had hurt some feelings. There is also no doubt, he himself had his feelings hurt (2 Cor 2:5) when interacting with the believers in Corinth. A review of the synopsis of the August 10 lesson (above) will reveal much of this.

The reference scripture is an obvious attempt by Paul to create a better relationship with the church in Corinth; one which would be more endearing and empathetic toward him (and Timothy). He wrote in a humble manner, and explained the hardships they had endured in order to spread the Good News of Christ (an example is 2 Cor 6:5). He then humbly asked the Corinthians to embrace them and their message.

We can all take Paul's example as the way we should be. If more people were willing to make a humble appeal for reconciliation, there would be fewer broken marriages and friendships. Also, if we clearly understood the hardships some people had to endure, perhaps we would have a more understanding nature towards them. Paul did both. He explained the hardships they had to endure to minister to those such as the Corinthians. He also asked the Corinthians to open there hearts to them (2 Cor 7:2).


The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
2 Corinthians 6:1-13
and 2 Corinthians 7:1-4. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




August 31 – Generosity in the Midst of Poverty
Alternate Title – Giving to Others

Bible Lesson: 2 Corinthians 8:1-14  

What we shall learn from this scripture:

Years ago, I complimented a 90 year-old lady on her sturdy and expensive looking handicap ramp. It was the best ramp I had ever seen at a private residence. She explained how she came to have it: A group of men from Frazer United Methodist Church in the city were part of a ministry which helped people like her. When they learned of her need, they volunteered to install the ramp for her, at no cost. They bought the materials, and worked all day long to install the ramp. She was not a member of their church, and not a Methodist. The vast majority of the members of Frazer did not live any where close to her and were not of the same ethnicity. Afterwards, she felt really close to this church, and sent them a letter of sincere and appreciative thanks. Then, she watched their worship service on TV every Sunday until her death seven years later.

This is an example of how generosity of a church toward an individual can have positive and lasting results. Paul and others led an effort to collect money, not for an individual, but for the whole Jerusalem church body. That effort had started earlier, but then apparently faltered. We can see in 1 Cor 16:1-2 the collection process was underway at the time he wrote that letter since Paul was giving them advice on how to save the funds. By the time of the writing of the second letter to the Corinth believers, there was a need for a new appeal. Our reference scripture for this lesson contains that appeal.

That Jerusalem region was undergoing harsh economic times and, as a result, the members of that church were also struggling. There were several Gentile churches which participated in the "Jerusalem Collection" to help the members of that church. In the end, Paul and others presented the gifts to the church in Jerusalem. This was a case where mainly Gentiles were helping the Jewish Christian congregation in Jerusalem.

Paul's appeal to the Corinthians for contributions seemed to be tailored especially for them. He appealed to their competitive nature by first proudly writing about how the members of the churches in Macedonia had so generously given even though they themselves were experiencing troubling times (2 Cor 8:2). Then, to inspire the Corinthians to give, (seemingly by comparison to the churches in Macedonia) he pointed out how gifted and blessed the believers were in Corinth (2 Cor 8:7 and 2 Cor 8:14). He did all this while not actually using the term "money". Instead, the terms - generosity, gifts, and gracious act of giving - were used by Paul.

This lesson points out how the Lord wants us to help each other in times of need. To understand His desires for this type caring, all one has to do is to read Matthew 25:34-46 to understand this clearly. Being generous to someone, or to a group of people, during a time of need can, not only help advance God's Kingdom on earth, but also is how the Lord wants us to be. Jesus said one of the two greatest commandments is for us to love our neighbor as we love ourselves (Matt 22:39-40).

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
2 Corinthians 8:1-14
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




September 7 – A Vision of the Future
Alternate Title – A Promise Assured

Bible Lesson: Jeremiah 30:1-3, 18-22 

Background:
Jeremiah was a very interesting prophet who was born during the 55-year reign of King Manasseh. This king did evil and detestable things in the Lord's sight. Not only did he worship idol gods (2 Kings 21:2), but also put a carved image of the idol goddess Asherah in the Lord's Temple (2 Kings 21:7). His successor, Amon, continued his father's pagan practices, but was assassinated after only a year or two of being in power. Amon's son, Josiah, was crowned king when he was only 8 years old. This king rejected idol worship and revived worshipping the Lord. Jeremiah started his ministry during 13th year of the rule of this King.

However, Judah return to pagan worship under King Jehoiakim after Josiah was killed in battle. Jeremiah's message from the Lord to Judah was they would surely be punished severely if they continued to worship idol gods. Among other things, Jeremiah was woefully sadden because the people of Israel did not heed the warnings he conveyed to them from the Lord. He lived to see the time when the Lord's threat of punishment came to fruition in 586 BC when Babylon invaded Judah and destroyed the Lord's Temple in Jerusalem. The Israelites were sent into exile.

His writings revealed a significant amount of his personal feelings and lamentations, as compared to many other prophets. Because of this, he is sometimes referred to as the "weeping prophet."

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:
All of Jeremiah's writings were not gloom and doom, but parts were about the faithfulness and forgiving spirit of the Lord. He prophesied the exile of the Israelites by the Babylonians would be temporary (Jer 29:10 11) and the Lord would once again restore His people (Jer 30:3). Even though Jeremiah was not alive to witness the restoration, the Israelites were indeed rescued by the Lord and allowed to return to their homeland after 70 years. This 70-year period was foretold in Jeremiah's writings (Jer 29:10).

Should we marvel at the accuracy of Jeremiah's prophecy? No. He was speaking for the Lord who is in complete control of present and future events. Therefore, we can put great confidence in a promise made by Him. When a person makes a promise, any number of unforeseen circumstances can cause the promise to be broken. But, for the Lord, there are no unforeseen circumstances; He knows all. He punished the Israelites for their idol worship, but He also promise to restore them in the future. At that time, they would rejoice in His faithfulness, and worship Him as their God (Jer 30:19 22).

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Jeremiah 30:1-3, 18-22
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




September 14 – Hope for the Future
Alternate Title – Hope For Tommorrow

Bible Lesson: Jeremiah 31:31-37 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:
This section of scripture foretells the coming of God's new covenant (Jer 31:31) with the Israelite nations (Israel and Judah). This covenant was realized when Jesus died on the cross for our sins over 600 years after this prophecy was made. With the new covenant, God promised to write his instructions on the hearts of the believers(Jer 31:33). We know this was accomplished (after Jesus ascended to heaven) when the Holy Spirit was sent to indwell all believers. The Holy Spirit still provides us with a close association with God on a personal basis (Ezek 36:27). This is one of the most important and valuable gifts God has given us.

The message of hope and redemption was given to the Israelites by Jeremiah at a time when they needed hope. Because of their unfaithfulness to God's desires, He allowed them to be conquered by the Babylonians and sent into exile. The message of hope was not anything which would directly affect the people who were living at that time. They would not live to see the arrival of Jesus. But, it is a message which confirmed God had not abandoned them as a people. He still had great plans for their people in the future.

In the New Testament book of Hebrews, verses 31-34 of our reference scripture are quoted in Heb 8:8-12. This quoting was in reference to how Jesus' death on the cross was the realization of the new covenant (Heb 9:15).

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Jeremiah 31:31-37
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




September 21 – Anticipation of a New Future
Alternate Title – Property For Sale

Bible Lesson: Jeremiah 32:1-9, 14-15 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:
The Dow Jones stock average, along with the housing market, took a nosedive during the financial crisis which started in 2008. Those who had confidence that the economy would rebound, could have made a great deal of money by investing when the market was at its lowest value at the start of 2009. The market valuation is now more than double what it was during that period. But, no one knew for sure when the market was at its lowest, so many people stayed away from investing because the future was uncertain. They were afraid the market would continue downward and even more money would be lost. It could be like investing heavily in the 8-track tape industry in the late 70's to only see that industry plummet in the early 80's ... never to return.

Jeremiah knew of the future of Judah. He had it on good authority (from God) the Babylonians would conquer Judah and send the Israelites into exile. This would make Israelite ownership of land in Judah a worthless undertaking. So, why did he buy such land from his cousin (Jer 32:9)? The reason was to make a declaration of faith in the word of God that Israelites would return to the land in the future and would once again buy and sale property (Jer 32:15).

Jeremiah did as the Lord instructed him, and made provisions to preserve the deed of sale (Jer 32:14). This was done to further proclaim God's promise that the Israelites would return to the land ... but it would not be soon. He would not be alive to see these future events, but his investment into land was symbolic of his confidence in the Lord's word which he had prophesied to the people. The Israelites were indeed rescued by the Lord and allowed to return to their homeland after 70 years. This 70-year period was foretold in Jeremiah's writings (Jer 29:10).

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Jeremiah 32:1-9, 14-15
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.

For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the
World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible,the Wryer Study Bible (NIV), and the Standard Lesson Commentary.



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