Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated July 22, 2016)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference Scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the NewLivingTranslation.com site where the Scripture will be displayed in the plain English of the NLT Bible.


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July 3 – Needing More Than Law
Alternate Title – Ignoring The Law's Requirement

Bible Lesson: Romans 2:17-29 ; the key verse is: Romans 2:13

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

There are some people who can eloquently quote Scripture and others who study or read the Bible almost every day. They could be preachers, teachers, or other such leaders in the church, including those who can say beautiful and inspiring prayers. Many of us have admired such people and respected them for their values and actions. However, in doing so, we may have forgotten the fact that we are all sinners, including the same people we admire. Then, when we are presented with flaws in those people we have placed on such a pedestal, our faith and commitment could be shaken.

We all have a public life, a private life, and a secret life. The person you see in church may be different in the private confines of their home or in their daily life. They could be even more different within the secrecy of their thoughts. We are all sinners (Romans 3:23) and can never do enough right things to gain eternal life on our own. It is possible to hide our secret thoughts from everyone except God (Romans 2:16). Even though our goal is to be obedient to God, ultimately the only way we can gain salvation is through His grace. If we could be saved by keeping the law, there would have been no reason for Christ to die on the cross (Galatians 2:21).

Our reference scripture is about hypocrisy—saying or teaching one thing, but doing something which is counter to what was said. A common way of calling a person a hypocrite is to say someone talks the talk but does not walk the talk. This means they do not act in a way that agrees with the things they say. God made Israel His special people and they were supposed to be an example to all others how to relate to Him. It is said in the Bible, in reference to the Isralites, "...you will be the light to guide all nations" (Isaiah 42:6). But in our reference Scripture, Paul accused some of the Israelites of teaching others what not to do but then breaking the law themselves (Romans 2:21-22). Their disobedient actions were not only hypocritical but also caused others to sin (Romans 2:24).

It is not enough to just know the Word, teach the Word, or even preach the Word. Paul said, what makes us right in God's sight is that we should live the Word; doing what He wants us to do (Romans 2:13). On the other hand, we must all realize that all of us have shortcomings and will fall short of God's perfect ideals. No person is or will be perfect as long as they are human.

A good analogy of the Christian walk in life is a football game. Not every play will result in a first down or a touchdown. We sin and lose yards on some downs. Our objective is to play the game well enough to win against Satan's team which uses dirty tricks and underhanded plays. At times, it may seem we are playing at a disadvantage and will lose the game. But, through Jesus - our coach, we have come to realize we can't win the game alone. Winning this game requires we play with the supernatural power of God's grace. Once we are saved, we will have that power, and we will have victory through Jesus.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 2:17-29 ; the key verses is Romans 2:13.





July 10 – Struggling Under Sin's Power
Alternate Title – Under Sin's Power

Bible Lesson: Romans 3:9-20 ; the key verse is: Romans 3:20

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

It's important to know the rules if we are going to participate in any activity, especially where other people are involved. If we don't know the rules of driving a car, we could end up in a head-on collision by driving on the wront side, or be given numerous driving citations by unwittingly violating the driving laws. A person has to know the rules to correctly play tennis, golf, basketball, or any such game where others are involved. Some of us, unfortunately, who know the rules still do not abide by them.

God's rules help us play the game of life in a special way. The rules demonstrate how we should love God and our fellowman. The greatest commandment is to love God (Matt 22:36-38), and the second greatest is to love our neighbor (Matt 22:39). These two form the basis for the others (Matt 22:40). By striving to live by God's rules, we are showing our love and obedience to Him.

By studying God's word, we can become aware of His rules, His character, and what he expects of us. Even with the knowledge of His rules, we still sin, due to our human nature. We know lying is breaking one of His rules, but we do it anyway on purpose to hid something from other people. Becoming part of an illicit affair is something we know is wrong, but we may willingly rush into it anyway.

Paul said, the Jews and Gentiles are both under the influence of sin (Romans 3:9), but unlike the Gentiles of that period, God had revealed His law to the Jews. This emphasizes the fact that no one is without sin (Romans 3:10), and all will fall short of God's perfect ideals. We all are going to struggle under sin's power because we are incapable of living sin-free regardless if we do or do not know all of God's rules (the law).

The more we study the laws of the Bible, the more we will come to realize how impossible it is for anyone to abide by all of them. This not only includes the things we should not do but also the things we should do. In other words, even if we could avoid lying, cheating, and stealing, we may be guilty of not helping the poor, disadvantaged, and others who are in need. These are called sins of ommission. This type sin is what James referred to when he said, "If anyone, then, knows the good they ought to do and doesn't do it, it is sin for them" ( James 4:17, NIV). We can also committ sin even by our thoughts (Matthew 5:27-28). In general, we sin when we have failed to measure up to the standards God has set for us.

As Christians, the requirements of last paragraph reveals to us just how much we need God's grace since we can't gain salvation by trying to do everything God wants us to do every minute of our life. We will always slip up and sin and will need His forgiveness. God showed us how He wants us to live through the example of His Son Jesus Christ - the only one who existed in a human body sin-free. Christ is the one we should model our life afterwards.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 3:9-20 ; the key verse is Romans 3:20.





July 17 – God Set Things Right
Alternate Title – Set Right By Grace

Bible Lesson: Romans 3:21-31 ; the key verses are: Romans 3:22-24 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

If we study the biblical books of Leviticus and Deuteronomy, we will find many parts of the law under the covenant between God and the ancient Israelites. The law covered most aspects of life and what was needed to be done in order to be forgiven for breaking one of the laws. There are numerous procedures involving animal sacrifices which had to be followed to atone for sins. This was a complicated system and required a person to provide specific types of animals or birds which would be put to death (a sacrifice) in order for forgiveness to be granted.

An example of one type of sacrifice was the Burnt Offering, where the worshipper would present the animal to be sacrificed at the door of the Tabernacle (Lev 1:3). The worshipper would place his hand upon the head of the innocent animal - realizing it stood in for him - and he would kill the animal immediately to atone for his sins (Lev 1:4-9). Even the High Priest had to atone for his sins through a sacrifice. No one is without sin (Romans 3:23).

The whole sacrificial system foreshadowed the sacrifice Christ would make on the cross. His sacrifice was unlike any other, for he was sinless and completely innocent and his death and resurrection paid our sin debt and ushered into existence a new covenant between God and those who accepted Christ as their Lord and Savior (Luke 22:20). The new covenant, through the blood of Jesus on the cross, provided complete forgiveness for our sins through the grace of God (Romans 3:25). But, we must believe in and place our trust in Jesus Christ (Romans 3:22, 3:26). Paul explained that this salvation is available for both Jews and Gentiles (Romans 3:29) for God is the God of all people and not just the Jews.

Even though we are saved by faith, it should lead us to want to and strive to live according to God's standard. We can't just forget about His commandments (Romans 3:31) and think we have a "license to sin" just because we are saved (or think we are saved). When our time comes to enter heaven, the last thing we want to hear when we face Jesus is, "I never knew you. Get away from me, you who break God's laws." (Matthew 7:23).

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 3:21-31 ; key verses are Romans 3:22-24.





July 24 – Unwavering Hope
Alternate Title – Not Without Hope

Bible Lesson: Romans 5:1-11 ; key verse: Romans 5:5 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

The reference Scripture is one of faith, gratitude, hope, and Joy. We are grateful for the sacrifice made for us through the death of Jesus Christ on the cross. Through this sacrifice, a new covenant between God and humanity was established in which, by His grace, we joyfully look forward to sharing in God's glory (Romans 5:2). By His sacrifice, we will be made right in God's sight. This doesn't mean we will be faultless, but it means we will be presented faultless, not because of what we did, but because of what Christ did for us. This belief is quite often repeated in many churches in the benediction of the worship service—quoted from Jude 1:24, KJV: "Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy."

Faith is the confidence that what we hope for will actually happen; it gives us assurance about things we cannot see (Hebrews 11:1). By our faith in God, through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, we are able to accept the rough places in life because we know He is directing our life and all things work for our good (Romans 8:28). By working for the good, we mean working toward making us holy and more like Jesus; which should be the goal of all who call themselves Christians.

When things don't go as we would desire them to, those situations are also for our benefit in developing our endurance, character, and maturity as Christians (Romans 5:3-4). God wants us to depend on Him for help when we face difficult times. By doing so, we are acknowledging his supreme power over all in existence. He has given us the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit to help us through the trials of life. Under the guidance and influence of the Holy Spirit, we can face the trials of life more confidently and with greater hope and anticipation of salvation.

We know that God loves us for he gave His only Son as the perfect sacrifice for our sins (John 3:16). In addition to this fact, Jesus said, "This is My commandment, that you love one another as I loved you. Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends." (John 15:12-13). To give up your life for a most worthy person is difficult for the best of us, but Jesus did it for all of us, even though we are all sinners (Romans 5:7-8).

Just knowing God cares for us and is directing our life can change our perception of what happens to us on a daily basis. We can live more joyfully, with unwavering hope. Living this way gives greater significance to the words of the song, "His Eye Is On The Sparrow." –

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 5:1-11 ; the key verse is Romans 5:5.






July 31 – From Death to Life
Alternate Title – Raised To New Life

Bible Lesson: Romans 6:1-4, 12-14, 17-23 ; key verse: Romans 6:4 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

As Christians, we have faith all our sins will be forgiven through the grace of God. Unfortunately, this belief can sometimes work against our goal to be holy; trapping us in a world of sin. Just as an alcoholic probably did not set out to be one, so may we become habitual sinners. As any honest alcoholic can tell you, after you become a slave to alcohol, it is very difficult and almost insurmountable to stop. Likewise, most of us can testify how difficult it is to give up habitual sins. Whether it is an illicit affair, gossiping, or some other frequently committed sin on our part, giving it up can be a real struggle.

Paul admonished the Christians to not let sin control their lives (Romans 6:12), for the wages of sin is death (Romans 6:23). This is meant as spiritual death, as contrasted with eternal life through Jesus Christ. Even though our sins should result in our spiritual death, we can have new life through God's grace. In general, grace is when God does something good for us which we don't deserve. None of us have earned and deserve eternal life by our own works, for we are all sinners, and fall short of God's ideal and glory (Romans 3:23). But God has promised us eternal life through the sacrifice of Jesus—which atones for all our sins. Just as Christ was raised from the dead by God, we also may live new lives (Romans 6:4) and in the future be transformed one final time to spend eternity with God (1 Cor 15:52).

Eternal life—our new life—is ours for the taking, but we must personally make the move to claim it. That means we must express our faith in Jesus Christ and His resurrection from the dead. To help control our sinful desires, we have been given the Holy Spirit who indwells all believers. However, to make use of this valuable gift, we must allow the Holy Spirit to guide our days. If we sincerely want to be associated with Christ, we must seek to live by His example.

Even though we are saved by faith, it should lead us to want to, and strive to live according to God's standard. We can't just forget about His commandments (Romans 3:31) and think we have a "license to sin" just because we are saved (or think we are saved). When our time comes to enter heaven, the last thing we want to hear when we face Jesus is, "I never knew you. Get away from me, you who break God's laws." (Matthew 7:23).

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 6:1-4, 12-14, 17-23 ; the key verse is Romans 6:4.





August 7 – More Than Conquerors
Alternate Title – Safe In God's Love

Bible Lesson: Romans 8:28-39 ; key verse: Romans 8:31 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

When things happen to us in our life which leads to depression and woefulness, we may wonder why. "Does it mean the Lord no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger...? (Romans 8:35). When we learn to put our faith and confidence in God, we don't have to wonder why distressful things happen to us, because we know all things in our life are arranged for our good (Romans 8:28). The "good" is so that we can be more holy and ultimately spend eternity with Him. We know He still loves us because we are saved through the blood of His son Jesus (Romans 8:37). As we have pledged that Jesus is our Lord and Savior, so has God promised His faithfulness to us. Nothing can separate us from His love (Romans 8:38).

When we love the Lord, we know—regardless of what happens—He is directing our steps. From the Book of the Holy Spirit, "The Lord is more interested in changing us, and how we meet the challenges of life, than to simply change or fix the challenges themselves." He is more interested in saving our soul for eternity than giving us a happy-go-lucky earthly life with no difficulties.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 8:28-39 ; the key verse is Romans 8:31.




August 14 – Living Under God's Mercy
Alternate Title – Dependent On God's Mercy

Bible Lesson: Romans 9:6-18 ; key verse: Romans 9:18 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

The history of the world contains many leaders who thought they were in charge: Pharaoh, Napoleon, Custer, and Hitler are just a few who thought they controlled their own destiny and the destiny of those around them. The fact is, it is God who controls the destiny of the world and all who are in it. Satan may wreak havoc among us, but even he is powerless compared to God.

Paul cited two examples which show that God is in charge. First, he cited the birth of the twins Jacob and Esau. While they were still in the womb, He decided Jacob would be the son through whom His promise to Abraham would be kept (Romans 9:11). Even though Esau was the first to be born and therefore the oldest (he had the birthright), God said it would be the oldest, Esau, who would serve the youngest, Jacob (Romans 9:12, Genesis 25:23). This example demonstrated it is God who calls whom He desires to serve His purposes. In the case of the brothers, neither one had done any good or bad (they were still in the womb) so His decision was simply what He wanted according to His purposes (Romans 9:10). We know that later God changed Jacob's name to Israel (Gen 35:10) and it was through him the Israelite nation was established.

The second example was that of Pharaoh under whose command the Israelites were held in bondage. God told him, through Moses, he had been appointed so God could show His power over him and spread His fame throughout the land (Romans 9:17, Exodus 9:16).

These two examples signify the sovereignty of God. His decisions are His alone. Who He blesses and who he gives mercy to are His decisions only (Romans 9:15-16). Even though we live under His mercy and His control, we also have faith in the surety of His promises made through His son Jesus. Even though God can give to us or take from us whenever he desires, we believe ultimately the covenant we have with Him through His son Jesus will result in eternal life with Him. His promises are made through His grace ... He doesn't owe us anything and we have not earned anything.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 9:6-18 ; the key verse is Romans 9:18.


For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Wryer Study Bible (NIV), and the Standard Lesson Commentary. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in this page. The opinions expressed are his alone.



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