Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated August 24, 2016)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference Scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the New Living Translation version of the reference Scripture. This version is easier to understand than some of the other translations.


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August 7 – More Than Conquerors
Alternate Title – Safe In God's Love

Bible Lesson: Romans 8:28-39 ; key verse: Romans 8:31 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

When things happen to us in our life which leads to depression and woefulness, we may wonder why. "Does it mean the Lord no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger...? (Romans 8:35). When we learn to put our faith and confidence in God, we don't have to wonder why distressful things happen to us, because we know all things in our life are arranged for our good (Romans 8:28). The "good" is so that we can be more holy and ultimately spend eternity with Him. We know He still loves us because we are saved through the blood of His son Jesus (Romans 8:37). As we have pledged that Jesus is our Lord and Savior, so has God promised His faithfulness to us. Nothing can separate us from His love (Romans 8:38).

When we love the Lord, we know—regardless of what happens—He is directing our steps. From the Book of the Holy Spirit, "The Lord is more interested in changing us, and how we meet the challenges of life, than to simply change or fix the challenges themselves." He is more interested in saving our soul for eternity than giving us a happy-go-lucky earthly life with no difficulties.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 8:28-39 ; the key verse is Romans 8:31.




August 14 – Living Under God's Mercy
Alternate Title – Dependent On God's Mercy

Bible Lesson: Romans 9:6-18 ; key verse: Romans 9:18 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

The history of the world contains many leaders who thought they were in charge: Pharaoh, Napoleon, Custer, and Hitler are just a few who thought they controlled their own destiny and the destiny of those around them. The fact is, it is God who controls the destiny of the world and all who are in it. Satan may wreak havoc among us, but even he is powerless compared to God.

Paul cited two examples which show that God is in charge. First, he cited the birth of the twins Jacob and Esau. While they were still in the womb, He decided Jacob would be the son through whom His promise to Abraham would be kept (Romans 9:11). Even though Esau was the first to be born and therefore the oldest (he had the birthright), God said it would be the oldest, Esau, who would serve the youngest, Jacob (Romans 9:12, Genesis 25:23). This example demonstrated it is God who calls whom He desires to serve His purposes. In the case of the brothers, neither one had done any good or bad (they were still in the womb) so His decision was simply what He wanted according to His purposes (Romans 9:10). We know that later God changed Jacob's name to Israel (Gen 35:10) and it was through him the Israelite nation was established.

The second example was that of Pharaoh under whose command the Israelites were held in bondage. God told him, through Moses, he had been appointed so God could show His power over him and spread His fame throughout the land (Romans 9:17, Exodus 9:16).

These two examples signify the sovereignty of God. His decisions are His alone. Who He blesses and who he gives mercy to are His decisions only (Romans 9:15-16). Even though we live under His mercy and His control, we also have faith in the surety of His promises made through His son Jesus. Even though God can give to us or take from us whenever he desires, we believe ultimately the covenant we have with Him through His son Jesus will result in eternal life with Him. His promises are made through His grace ... He doesn't owe us anything and we have not earned anything.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 9:6-18 ; the key verse is Romans 9:18.




August 21 – Grafted In
Alternate Title – Grafted Into The Promise

Bible Lesson: Romans 11:11-24 ; key verse: Romans 11:22 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

Background: Abraham was born into a region where false gods were routinely worshiped. In fact, his father served other gods (Joshua 24:2). But, when God spoke to Abraham, he listened, trusted, and obeyed. God chose him to the be father of a nation of people through whom His glory would be revealed. These would be His chosen people to teach others about Him and through whom He would display His sovereign power.

As a people, Israel was blessed by God, beginning with the covenant between Abraham and the Lord. Through Abraham came Isaac, and through Isaac came Jacob. Through Jacob, came the Israelites. It was through these people that God's commands were sent to the world and through these people that God sent His Son Jesus, the Messiah, to earth.

Lesson: When the Jews (for the most part) rejected Jesus as the Messiah, the salvation He represented was offered to the Gentiles. In this way, the great blessing of the new covenant with God through Jesus was spread outside the Jewish community. Therefore, God not only blessed Israel, but through them, blessed the world. The Gentiles would benefit from God's promises to Israel. The expectation was that, by offering to the Gentiles this great gift, the Jews will be jealous and want the salvation also (Romans 11:14-15).

In the reference scripture, Paul used a metaphor to describe how the Gentiles' acceptance of the new salvation related to the Jews. In the metaphor, the Jewish community is like a cultivated olive tree rooted in God's promises to Israel. The Gentiles are like a branch from a wild olive tree which is graphed into the cultivated tree and thereby will benefit from the nourishment of the root (Romans 11:17).

In other words, in the case of the Gentiles, they were given the promise of salvation through Jesus which had been brought to the Jews—who rejected it. Conversely, the Jews who rejected the new salvation are like branches of the cultivated tree which are broken off due to disobedience. However, in the future, people of Israel can be graphed back in by God when they respond positively to the Good News (Romans 11:23).

Paul warned the Gentiles to be sure to persevere as believers. If they fail to sincerely believe in Jesus and what He brought to the world, their branch could be broken off as well (Romans 11:22). God has called us into fellowship with His son (1 Cor 1:9, NIV), and therefore we want to be faithful to God because we know He will be faithful to us and will keep His promises (Deut 7:9).

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 11:11-24 ; the key verse is Romans 11:22.




August 28 – Love Fulfills the Law

Bible Lesson: Romans 12:1-2 & Romans 13:8-10 ; key verse: Romans 13:8 (NLT)
Additional Scripture for some lesson versions: Matthew 22:35-40

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

From the dictionary, a definition of fulfill is "to do what is required to satisfy." Whether we consider the Old Testament or the New Testament, any commandment (Law) from God states what He requires from our behavior—not just what He desires or asks for, but what He requires. We are placed on earth to worship Him, so it is understandable that the most important commandment is to love God. To love God includes obeying Him. This is a requirement not only concerns our body (Romans 12:1) but also our mind (Romans 12:2). Jesus said we are to love God with our heart, soul, and mind (Matthew 22:37-38).

The second most important commandment is His requirement that we love our neighbor as our self. When we love others we will not do harm to them, which sums up many of the Ten Commandments (Romans 13:9). Jesus said to love your neighbor as yourself (Matt 22:39).

These two commandments to love are at the root of all the rest of the commandments (Matt 22:40). Therefore, it is love which fulfills the law (Romans 13:8). But the real lesson is putting God's commandment to love into action as a part of our life. It's easy to love someone who does good for us and who loves us back. However, it is all to often easier to hate someone who has done us wrong or caused us (or someone close to us) mental or physical pain. How do we handle such human feelings as these? The Lord's answer is to place our hand in His and place our confidence and trust in His judgment. It may take us a while to turn hate into love, but God says we are to love even our enemies (Luke 6:27-28).

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Romans 12:1-2 , Romans 13:8-10 (and for some lessons also Matthew 22:35-40;) the key verse is Romans 13:8.




September 4 – The Peaceful Kingdom

Bible Lesson: Isaiah 11:1-9 ; key verse: Isaiah 11:9 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

This Scripture points to the second coming of Christ. He will reign on earth for a thousand years—His millennial kingdom. There will be no hostilities, hatred or animosity. Isaiah 11:6 indicated this peaceful existence with examples of animals living in harmony with each other; ordinarily they would have a predator-prey, or otherwise disharmonious relationship. The kingdom will be a peaceful one, free of all those who would hurt or destroy (Isaiah 11:9). During this time, Satan will not be allowed to function and deceive humanity (Revelation 20:3). It will be a peaceful kingdom.

Note: The Second Coming is different from the Rapture. The Rapture is when Christ will remove the believers from earth into glory (Matt 24:40-41). Afterwards, there will be a period of terrible tribulation for those who remain (Rev 3:10). After the Great Tribulation will be the second coming of Christ and the establishment of His kingdom.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Isaiah 11:1-9 ; the key verse is Isaiah 11:9.



September 11 – The Mountain of God

Bible Lesson: Isaiah 25:6-10A ; key verse: Isaiah 25:8 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

The lesson Scripture makes reference to the gracious invitation for salvation offered by the Lord; offered to all the world. The great banquet in Jerusalem is a symbol of the celebratory and rich nature of this promise from God (Isaiah 25:6). Part of the 9th verse— "Let us rejoice in the salvation He brings!"— proclaims the blessing of this gift (Isaiah 25:9). The One who brought this salvation was Jesus Christ. The offer of it to the world was realized through the sacrifice He made on the cross.

Through Christ, death will be defeated—"He will swallow up death forever." (Isaiah 25:8). In the New Testament, Paul makes reference to this in 1 Corinthians 15:54 when he said our mortal bodies will be transformed into immortal bodies and “Death is swallowed up in victory".

Isaiah is referring to the last days, the days of the Messiah, when His kingdom should be set up in the world. In Isaiah 2:3— "Come let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, ... For the Lord's teaching will go out from Zion; His word will go out from Jerusalem." This may not refer to an actual physical geographical city which now exist, but could refer to the "new Jerusalem" described in Revelations. Rev 21:10 — "So he took me in the Spirit to a great, high mountain, and he showed me the holy city, Jerusalem, descending out of heaven from God". Rev 21:2 — "And I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven like a bride beautifully dressed for her husband."

Discussion of the mountain of God gives us reason to look to the future with hope and anticipation of the salvation promised to us by Him; through His Son Jesus Christ. There will be no death or hostilities—it will be a time of peace. It will be a time for believers to rejoice, for we trusted the Lord and He did not forsake us (Isaiah 25:9).

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Isaiah 25:6-10A ; the key verse is Isaiah 25:8.



September 18 – Foundations of the Earth

Bible Lesson: Isaiah 40:21-31 ; key verse: Isaiah 40:28 (NLT)

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

As we read the reference Scripture, it might occur to us another name for the lesson could be, "Who is God?" He was there before the world began (Isaiah 40:21) and created not only the earth (Isaiah 40:28) but all the stars (Isaiah 40:26). He is the one who sits in judgment of all people including those who have earthly power and prestige (Isaiah 40:23). Compared to His immense nature of power and control, we are but mere insects (Isaiah 40:22). There is no one who is His equal (Isaiah 40:25). Through Him is the beginning and the basis for all in existence: the foundation of the earth and the universe.

The last verse in our Scripture for today—Isaiah 40:31, KJV—is one which is often quoted and often used as a basis for courage in the face of hardship. It is a poetic expression of of the hope and strength we seek through the power of God: "But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint."

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Isaiah 40:21-31 ; the key verse is Isaiah 40:28.

For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Ryrie Study Bible (NIV), and the Standard Lesson Commentary. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in this page. The opinions expressed are his alone.



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