Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated October 15, 2014)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the NewLivingTranslation.com site where the scripture will be displayed in the plain English of the NLT Bible.


October 5 – Yet I Will Rejoice
Alternate Title – The Rewards Of Patience

Bible Lesson: Habakkuk 2:1-5 ; 3:17-19

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

The prophet Habakkuk lamented to God about the violence and other sinful behavior going on in Judah (Hab 1:4). He expressed his perplexing thoughts to God as to why He, seemingly, was allowing this terrible behavior to continue (Hab 1:2). He asked the Lord for an answer and vowed to wait patiently for the answer to his complaint (Hab 2:1).

As Habakkuk observed over 2600 years ago, many of us see things happening today which may prompt us to ask God why He is allowing them to continue. We are witnesses to the success of groups of people to keep God out of the schools and the government; the two places where He is really needed. When I was in elementary school many years ago, the principal would openly pray for children who had done terrible wrong things. If that occurred today, the principal most probably would be looking for another job shortly after the first prayer. Today we have many groups, and individuals existing in communities and the world, who thrive off of violence and terror. In recent years, we have seen many senseless terrorist attacks worldwide, and mass murders in the schools and other places with no remorse displayed by the ones doing the killing.

Like Habakkuk, there are many of us in the United States who, today, might ask why He allows senseless violence in the world, and lack of respect for His word in schools and the government to continue. But, also like Habakkuk, even though (the present may often seem depressing and bleak at times,) ... yet we will rejoice in the Lord. We know God has a plan for us as revealed by His covenant (with us) through Jesus Christ. Many of us have heard the quote about the Lord which says, "He may not come when you want Him to, but He's never late!" As it was with Habakkuk, He is the God of our salvation (Hab 3:18) and we will rejoice in this knowledge and continue to trust in Him, regardless of present events. We must continue to remember the Lord is sovereign, holy, and merciful. He knows the best path for us all, and in the end, all things will be made right according to His purpose and His time line.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Habakkuk 2:1-5
and Habakkuk 3:17-19. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




October 12 – I Know That My Redeemer Lives
Alternate Title – Confident Of Redemption

Bible Lesson: Job 19:1-7, 23-29 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

We don't know who wrote the book of Job or the exact date of the writing. However, the writer depicts what real suffering can be like. Job was a blessed man and the Lord thought very highly of him (Job 1:8). He was financially successful, had a large family, and was respected in his community (Job 1:2-3). But, all of this was suddenly taken away from him and he did not know why. He was not aware of the reason the Lord had allowed Satan to cause Job so much grief.

Satan had told God, the only reason Job was such a righteous man was because of all the blessings he had received, and if those were taken away, he would curse the Lord (Job 1:11). God had great confidence in Job's endurance and righteousness, and allowed Satan to test these qualities in him (Job 1:12). Events then unfolded which took away Job's wealth and family. So much pain and grief was inflicted on Job, he questioned why God would allow him to suffer in such a way (Job 7:20). He cried out in anguish (Job 7:16), but, through it all, in the end he still looked forward to seeing the Lord with his own eyes (Job 19:27).

Bildad was one of the three people visiting Job while he was suffering. These were Job's friends (Job 2:11) and were there to comfort him. As someone once said, "With friends like these, who needs enemies!" Rather than showing great care and concern, many of the comments made to Job by Bildad (and the other two friends) mocked him and indicated he must be at fault because of his own wickedness (Job 19:5). In response to Bildad, Job defended himself (Job 19:5-6), and chastised him for what he had said (Job 19:3-4).

Even while in the midst of the pain and suffering (which Job thought was being wrongly applied to him) and the mockery of his "so called" friends, he had faith he would be vindicated and redeemed. He said, "But as for me, I know that my Redeemer lives ...." (Job 19:25) He never lost hope that one day he would be vindicated ... even if that time came after his death. He knew God was the only one who could answer why he was being so tormented. Today, we also have a Redeemer, and His name is Jesus. He redeemed us through his death and resurrection; paying our sin debt forever.

When we are in good health, enjoy financial stability, and generally are satisfied with how our life is going, it's much easier to smile and be in good cheer. But this is often a tenuous and frail existence. The book of Job expresses the frailty of human emotions. It shows how pain and suffering can cause the best of us to break down, lose our control, and give in to hopelessness and despair. As good as he was, Job was still human and as a result exhibited human emotions such as rage, disappointment, and despair. But, he never completely gave up, and he never cursed God as Satan thought he would (Job 1:11).

For many of us, it would take a lot less than what happened to Job to send us into a tailspin. However, during times of adversity and pain, the Lord wants us to turn to Him for help; through prayer. By doing so, we acknowledge His complete control over all in existence.

When considering the story of Job, a very interesting sequence of events happens at the end. The Lord told the three friends of Job He was angry with them because they had not spoken the truth about Him (Job 42:7). They were misrepresenting what His thoughts were and spoke as if they had the authority to speak for Him. They were wrong; He was not punishing Job for his sins, as they kept insisting The Lord was doing.

God told them that Job would pray for them and He would accept his prayer on their behalf and have mercy on them (Job 42:8). This seemed to be a final test for someone who had gone through so much; to pray for the ones who had added to his torment with their uncaring words. This would be a difficult, if not impossible, task for many of us; to pray for those who had humiliated and mocked us in our most serious time of need. But, Job did this final thing, and at that point, the Lord restored his fortunes (Job 42:10).

Forgiveness of others is a hallmark of Christianity. Christ gave us the model to follow when He asked for the forgiveness of those who crucified Him (Luke 23:34) and taught us to continue to forgive (Matt 18:21-22).

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Job 19:1-7, 23-29
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




October 19 – I Will Call on God
Alternate Title – Defiant Faithfulness

Bible Lesson: Job 24:1, 9-12, 19-25  Key Verse: Psalm 55:16 KJV

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

The key verse for this lesson is, "As for me, I will call upon God; And the Lord shall save me." (Psalm 55:16 KJV). This is one of the few times our key verse is not contained in the reference scripture. However, this verse is relevant, considering Job's confusion as to why he was being made to suffer in such a way, while injustice and the wickedness seemed to flourish. The verse underscores the need for us to have undying faith in God's judgment in the face of what appears to be an unfair and unjust world.

Job questioned why the wicked go without being punished (Job 24:1). Then, later, he confirms his belief they will eventually be punished (Job 24:20). Some say, he was speaking out of sarcasm, but I choose to believe he was relying on faith that, in the end, the Lord will punish those who deserve to be punished. However, who that is, and what punishment is needed, is God's decision. We are all sinners, and deserve punishment. However, when we sin, we don't expect a lightning bolt to strike us immediately. Our gracious God gives us an opportunity to choose to repent on our own. Regardless of what we have done, we all have an opportunity to repent and be forgiven of our sins.

At some time in our life, we will experience our own personal version of Job's hardship. While, perhaps, not as severe, we will have multiple nagging problems at once. It may seem to us, that regardless of how much we pray, our problems continue to exist. Recently, I heard someone say, his hearing, eyesight, and hip are all going bad at the same time. In addition to all of that, or perhaps because of all of that, he suffers from depression. When asked how he was dealing with it, he said, "I deal with it by being grateful for all the years in the past the Lord gave me good health, and for the blessings He is giving me now." With that attitude, he has a good foothold on being saved, and the Lord is more interested in our soul being saved than fixing each of our problems or making every wrong right. Likewise, we should pray for a person's soul to be saved rather than being so concerned with the punishment WE HAVE DECIDED that person should receive.

Someone asked, why do we need to pray and ask the Lord for His help since He already knows our problems and that we need His help? Why, then, do we have to ask him for His help, through prayer? The answer is simple. The Lord wants us to rely on Him, especially during times of great need, and ask for His help. By doing so, we are showing reverence by acknowledging His complete control over all in existence. He wants us to say, "As for me, I will call upon God; And the Lord shall save me." (Psalm_55:16 KJV)

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Job 24:1, 9-12, 19-25
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




October 26 – Things Too Wonderful for Me
Alternate Title – Who's In Control?

Bible Lesson: Job 42:1-10 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

To better understand what occurs in chapter 42, we should review a little of the previous chapters. Job did not understand why he was being punished so much. In numerous occasions, he defended his innocence (examples: Job:17:3-4, Job 31:7-8, Job 9:21). His three friends, who were visiting him, believed he was was being punished because of his sins (Job 32:1). A forth friend, Elihu, had the same opinion and even became angry because Job wouldn't admit he was rightfully being punished for his sins (Job 32:2).

Job questioned God's true intent (Job 10:13-14) and even His fairness (Job 10:3, Job 10:7) in reference to his troubles. Immersed in his human despair and agony, Job made statements which could be construed as insulting to the omnipotent and eternal God (Job 10:4-5). Elihu reminded Job that no one has the authority to tell God He was wrong (Job 36:22-23).

I think it was C. S. Lewis who made the statement, "Spiteful words can hurt your feelings but silence breaks your heart." Job could argue with his friends and plead his case with them, but God had remained silent, and He was the only one who could tell Job why he had all of the misfortune. This fact only frustrated him. But, finally, God responded in chapter 38 through 41. He challenged Job to explain with what authority did he have to question the wisdom of the Almighty. The Lord did this with a dazzling verbal display of His power ranging from the formation of the earth (Job 38:4) to His control of the stars (Job 38:31-33).

In Chapter 42, Job understood he had no authority to question God's wisdom or actions (Job 42:3). He realized the Lord's knowledge and control of earth was beyond his comprehension. The Common English Bible has this interpretation of 42:3, "... I have indeed spoken about things I didn't understand, wonders beyond my comprehension." Realizing the fact of his ignorance, as compared to God, he repented for the improper things he had said (Job 42:6).

From the October 12 lesson synopsis: When considering the story of Job, one very interesting sequence of events happens at the end. The Lord told the three friends of Job He was angry with them because they had not spoken the truth about Him (Job 42:7). They were misrepresenting what His thoughts were and spoke as if they had the authority to speak for Him. They were wrong; He was not punishing Job for his sins, as they kept insisting The Lord was doing.

God told them that Job would pray for them and He would accept his prayer on their behalf and have mercy on them (Job 42:8). This seemed to be a final test for someone who had gone through so much; to pray for the ones who had added to his torment with their uncaring words. This would be a difficult, if not impossible, task for many of us; to pray for those who had humiliated and mocked us in our most serious time of need. But, Job did this final thing, and at that point, the Lord restored his fortunes (Job 42:10).

Forgiveness of others is a hallmark of Christianity. Christ gave us the model to follow when He asked for the forgiveness of those who crucified Him (Luke 23:34) and taught us to continue to forgive (Matt 18:21-22).


The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Job 42:1-10
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




November 2 – God's Glory Fills the Temple
Alternate Title – Seeking A Place Of Praise

Bible Lesson: Ezekiel 43:1-12 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

Ezekiel began his ministry as a prophet about seven years before the fall of Jerusalem. He had a vision that showed the sinfulness of people which angered God (Ezek 8:6) and threaten to drive Him from the temple. Then, in his vision, the Lord decreed the destruction of Judah (Ezek 11:9), and His Glory departed the temple by the east gateway (Ezek 10:18-19). This departure would leave Judah and the temple in Jerusalem at the mercy of her enemies.

Before the fall of Jerusalem in 586 B.C., the Lord had provided a steady string of prophets such as Isaiah, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Habakkuk, who prophesied its destruction. But the people did not change their idolatrous ways. Just as with these prophets, Ezekiel warned the people of the coming destruction, but they did not heed his words either. Ezekiel was there when the Babylonians conquered the city, and destroyed the temple completely. Most of the people were either killed or sent into exile.

Just as with the previously mentioned prophets, Ezekiel also conveyed a message of the future revival of the Israelites. Many sermons have been based on the Valley of the Dry Bones; Ezekiel's vision of dry bones being given new life by God (Ezek 37). This signified the promise of the redemption and restoration of God's people of Israel if they would repent. This message came to Ezekiel after the fall of Jerusalem, when all seemed to be lost.

In a vision, Ezekiel witnessed the return of God's Glory to the temple (Ezek 43:4), in It filled the temple (Ezek 43:5). This signified how the future could, and would be when the people would relinquish their sinful and idolatrous ways; the reason for His previous anger. A new level of holiness was required if the people wanted God to dwell with them henceforth. They would no longer repeat the sins which defiled His temple and His holy name (Ezek 43:7). The Lord told Ezekiel to describe this vision of how the future could be to the people so they would be ashamed of their sins (Ezek 43:10), and be convicted to a new level of holiness.

This is not only a message for the people during Ezekiel's lifetime, it is also a message to us. Sometimes, a church membership can lose its way and mainly focus of everything but God. One day, years ago, I was watching the popular game show, "Family Feud," when the question was "What do you look forward to when you go to church?" The contestants were asked to give the top five answers. The top five did not include "Worshiping God," or "The Sermon." However, the top five did include "leaving church" as one of the things people looked forward to!

When a person experiences "young love," (and sometimes, old love) just think how excited he or she gets when they will be in the presence of their love interest. If we are on Family Feud, what would our top five answers be as to what we look forward to when we go to church? Do we go out of a sense of routine, social needs, because we like the music, or because we have a task to perform? If we want the Lord's glory to fill our church, we will go to church because we love the Lord and want to praise Him and express our appreciation to Him for all He has done for us.

When we see the lights are on inside a business, it's is an indication they are open for business. Metaphorically, imagine the Lord's glory is so strong in your church that it fills the church to the extent it is glowing. What would it mean? It would mean, your church is open for business - to do the Lord's work. All believers are indwelled by the Holy Spirit and, thereby represent a temple (1 Cor 6:19). Should our individual temples only be opened for business two hours out of the week. No. If we love the Lord, we will also want to live a life worthy of His faithfulness to us. Our lights will always be on and shining. "Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven." Matt 5:16, KJV.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Ezekiel 43:1-12
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




November 9 – The Altar Offers Hope
Alternate Title – Relishing Special Places

Bible Lesson: Ezekiel 43:13-21 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

Ezekiel's vision included God's description of the measurements of the new altar. This type temple Altar was a place where animal sacrifices were made for the people to atone for their sins. The animals had to be free of defects and they were killed at the altar. Gutters and collection areas were included to collect the blood from the slaughtered animals. There were sacrificial offerings where the animals were then completely burned up at the altar and other offerings where the animals were taken outside the temple area to be burned. The sacrificial system had a specific and complex set of rules, depending on the type of sacrifice being offered. A very good explanation of all the types of sacrifices made during the Mosaic period is located on the website agapebiblestudy.com.

The altar was important to God, otherwise He would not have gone through the trouble of revealing its measurements to Ezekiel. The Lord also gave him specific instructions on how to cleanse and sanctify the altar for holy use. Also included was a listing of the initial sacrifices needed for Him to accept His people (Ezek 43:27). This vision came to Ezekiel after the fall of Jerusalem, when the people's spirit was broken and they were despondent. The altar explanation is another example of instructions the people were given which brought hope to them.

This reminds me of something which happened to me in college. I was taking a very difficult civil engineering course in which my grade point average was hovering around "D" (or worse) as we approached final exams. My attitude was much like the Israelites; one of despondence. I did not want to repeat that difficult course which would then delay my graduation. I went to the professor and asked what the highest grade I could get out of this course called "Dynamics". I was hoping he would say "C." However, Dr. Mishu promptly replied with "A"... if I made the highest score on the final exam. Even though I had a hard task ahead, my feeling was one of hope and jubilation that he had that attitude of confidence in me.

I can only imagine the Israelites had a similar feeling of jubilation and hope because their exile was not God's last word for their people. A promising future awaited them if they did their part. Knowing that God had not abandoned them forever must have been a wonderful feeling. He was not only planning their restoration, but even had the details of the Altar which would go in the new temple. The measurements themselves are insignificant as compared to the fact that He had the measurements in the first place. They could relish this fact, because it meant He had great plans for His people in the future. All was not lost, and the redemption of the Israelites would eventually come, if they did their part in becoming obedient to God.

You may be wondering what happened to me with that college course 45 years ago? Well I spent 8 hours studying for that final exam while sitting on a bench in a nearby park. The exam was given that night and lasted for 3 hours. The next day, I ran into the professor in the lobby of the engineering building, and asked him how I did. The words he responded with still resonate in my memory: "You made an 86. That was the highest score!" Imagine, hypothetically, if you run into God in the lobby of Heaven after your death, and ask Him how you did in life, what would be His answer?

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Ezekiel 43:13-21
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




November 16 – Water from the Sanctuary Gives Life
Alternate Title – Life Needs Water

Bible Lesson: Ezekiel 47:1-12 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

Historical Background: To understand the significance of the life-giving river flowing into the Dead Sea, we must first understand the characteristics of the Dead Sea. It is theorized that at an earlier time in history, the Dead Sea was fed by ocean water by one means or another, but that source ceased, and a self-contained and landlocked lake was left. Over the years, much more of the water evaporated than could be replenished by rain or any other source, leaving a larger content of salt.

We cannot be certain this theory is correct. But, what we do know is the water has a high concentration of salt; almost 10 times that of ocean water. No fish, vegetation, or other life can grow in the sea or on its banks. At one point, it was referred to as "The Salt Sea," but visitors started calling it the Dead Sea because of the lack of life in and around it. As a point of interest, the area of the Dead Sea is the lowest (sea level) point on earth.

What we shall learn from the lesson scripture: Before the fall of Jerusalem in 586 B.C., the Lord had inspired a steady string of prophets (such as Isaiah, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Habakkuk) to prophesy the destruction of Jerusalem and its temple because of the sinful acts of the Israelites. But the people did not change their sinful and idolatrous ways. Just as with other prophets, Ezekiel warned the people of the coming destruction, but they did not heed his words either. Ezekiel was there when the Babylonians conquered the city, and destroyed the temple completely. Most of the people were either killed or sent into exile.

Just as with the previously mentioned prophets, Ezekiel also conveyed a message of the future revival of the Israelites. In his vision, the temple had been restored to its central influence among the people, and God's Glory had returned to it (Ezek 43:4). The renewed influence of the temple then emanated from inside it, and flowed outward, giving new spiritual life and healing to the people who had turned away from the Lord. In the vision, this life-giving influence is, metaphorically, depicted as a river of life. All along its banks were many florishing trees (Ezek 47:7).

The river got deeper and larger the further away from the temple it traveled (Ezek 47:5). It even gave life to the lifeless Dead Sea (Ezek 47:8-9) which resulted in many fish living in it (Ezek 47:10). This metaphor can also be applied to the influence Jesus Christ had on the people of earth. The salvation and promise of eternal life which He brought to earth has grown from a relatively small number of people to the over 2 billion Christians in 200 countries we have today. It is like a river of life which continues to flow and expand. All those who wish to, can drink its waters and have eternal life. Those who reject Christ and the "symbolic" living water which originates from Him, will experience spiritual death and damnation. In John 4:14, Jesus refers to the water he offers as that which leads to eternal life.

One cannot help but notice the similarities between the vision of the river of life in the book of Ezekiel to John's vision in Revelations 22. If you are interested in this comparison, there is a very good commentary on it at this website: BibleGateway.com website.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Ezekiel 47:1-12
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.

For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the
World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible,the Wryer Study Bible (NIV), and the Standard Lesson Commentary.



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