Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated September 17, 2014)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the NewLivingTranslation.com site where the scripture will be displayed in the plain English of the NLT Bible.


September 7 – A Vision of the Future
Alternate Title – A Promise Assured

Bible Lesson: Jeremiah 30:1-3, 18-22 

Background:
Jeremiah was a very interesting prophet who was born during the 55-year reign of King Manasseh. This king did evil and detestable things in the Lord's sight. Not only did he worship idol gods (2 Kings 21:2), but also put a carved image of the idol goddess Asherah in the Lord's Temple (2 Kings 21:7). His successor, Amon, continued his father's pagan practices, but was assassinated after only a year or two of being in power. Amon's son, Josiah, was crowned king when he was only 8 years old. This king rejected idol worship and revived worshipping the Lord. Jeremiah started his ministry during 13th year of the rule of this King.

However, Judah return to pagan worship under King Jehoiakim after Josiah was killed in battle. Jeremiah's message from the Lord to Judah was they would surely be punished severely if they continued to worship idol gods. Among other things, Jeremiah was woefully sadden because the people of Israel did not heed the warnings he conveyed to them from the Lord. He lived to see the time when the Lord's threat of punishment came to fruition in 586 BC when Babylon invaded Judah and destroyed the Lord's Temple in Jerusalem. The Israelites were sent into exile.

His writings revealed a significant amount of his personal feelings and lamentations, as compared to many other prophets. Because of this, he is sometimes referred to as the "weeping prophet."

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:
All of Jeremiah's writings were not gloom and doom, but parts were about the faithfulness and forgiving spirit of the Lord. He prophesied the exile of the Israelites by the Babylonians would be temporary (Jer 29:10 11) and the Lord would once again restore His people (Jer 30:3). Even though Jeremiah was not alive to witness the restoration, the Israelites were indeed rescued by the Lord and allowed to return to their homeland after 70 years. This 70-year period was foretold in Jeremiah's writings (Jer 29:10).

Should we marvel at the accuracy of Jeremiah's prophecy? No. He was speaking for the Lord who is in complete control of present and future events. Therefore, we can put great confidence in a promise made by Him. When a person makes a promise, any number of unforeseen circumstances can cause the promise to be broken. But, for the Lord, there are no unforeseen circumstances; He knows all. He punished the Israelites for their idol worship, but He also promise to restore them in the future. At that time, they would rejoice in His faithfulness, and worship Him as their God (Jer 30:19 22).

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Jeremiah 30:1-3, 18-22
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




September 14 – Hope for the Future
Alternate Title – Hope For Tommorrow

Bible Lesson: Jeremiah 31:31-37 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:
This section of scripture foretells the coming of God's new covenant (Jer 31:31) with the Israelite nations (Israel and Judah). This covenant was realized when Jesus died on the cross for our sins over 600 years after this prophecy was made. With the new covenant, God promised to write his instructions on the hearts of the believers(Jer 31:33). We know this was accomplished (after Jesus ascended to heaven) when the Holy Spirit was sent to indwell all believers. The Holy Spirit still provides us with a close association with God on a personal basis (Ezek 36:27). This is one of the most important and valuable gifts God has given us.

The message of hope and redemption was given to the Israelites by Jeremiah at a time when they needed hope. Because of their unfaithfulness to God's desires, He allowed them to be conquered by the Babylonians and sent into exile. The message of hope was not anything which would directly affect the people who were living at that time. They would not live to see the arrival of Jesus. But, it is a message which confirmed God had not abandoned them as a people. He still had great plans for their people in the future.

In the New Testament book of Hebrews, verses 31-34 of our reference scripture are quoted in Heb 8:8-12. This quoting was in reference to how Jesus' death on the cross was the realization of the new covenant (Heb 9:15).

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Jeremiah 31:31-37
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




September 21 – Anticipation of a New Future
Alternate Title – Property For Sale

Bible Lesson: Jeremiah 32:1-9, 14-15 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:
The Dow Jones stock average, along with the housing market, took a nosedive during the financial crisis which started in 2008. Those who had confidence that the economy would rebound, could have made a great deal of money by investing when the market was at its lowest value at the start of 2009. The market valuation is now more than double what it was during that period. But, no one knew for sure when the market was at its lowest, so many people stayed away from investing because the future was uncertain. They were afraid the market would continue downward and even more money would be lost. It could be like investing heavily in the 8-track tape industry in the late 70's to only see that industry plummet in the early 80's ... never to return.

Jeremiah knew of the future of Judah. He had it on good authority (from God) the Babylonians would conquer Judah and send the Israelites into exile. This would make Israelite ownership of land in Judah a worthless undertaking. So, why did he buy such land from his cousin (Jer 32:9)? The reason was to make a declaration of faith in the word of God that Israelites would return to the land in the future and would once again buy and sale property (Jer 32:15).

Jeremiah did as the Lord instructed him, and made provisions to preserve the deed of sale (Jer 32:14). This was done to further proclaim God's promise that the Israelites would return to the land ... but it would not be soon. He would not be alive to see these future events, but his investment into land was symbolic of his confidence in the Lord's word which he had prophesied to the people. The Israelites were indeed rescued by the Lord and allowed to return to their homeland after 70 years. This 70-year period was foretold in Jeremiah's writings (Jer 29:10).

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Jeremiah 32:1-9, 14-15
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




September 28 – Future Peace and Joy
Alternate Title – Laughter Will Return

Bible Lesson: Jeremiah 33:1-11 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

Through the prophet Jeremiah, the Lord said, all attempts by the people to defend the city (Jerusalem) from the Babylon invaders will fail (Jer 33:5). This did not happen by chance, but because God had decreed it, and He is in control of all events (Isaiah 14:24 ESV). Nowhere in the Bible is there a case where His plans were defeated. Even though the men of the city made every attempt (Jer 33:4) to stop the invasion, their efforts were futile, because God's plans cannot be defeated by man (Proverbs 16:33).

While the first five verses of chapter 33 paint a bleak picture for the Israelites, the rest of the chapter is nothing but good news. The defeat of Judah by the Babylonians was a punishment by God for idol worship and other sins of the people. There is no doubt He was angry at them because of their sins, but He also loved them and pledged to restore their joy in the future.

This gives us reason to contemplate the relationship a good parent has toward his (or her) child, when punishment is needed. The parent loves the child before the punishment and will love the child after the punishment. The discipline is given to teach right from wrong, so the child will grow up having a better chance of being a good person. This is the responsibility of all parents. As our heavenly Father, the Lord may punish us for doing wrong, but He has pledged to forgive all believers of sins through the new covenant. Because of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, we only need to repent and ask for His forgiveness.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Jeremiah 33:1-11
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




October 5 – Yet I Will Rejoice

Bible Lesson: Habakkuk 2:1-5 ; 3:17-19

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

The prophet Habakkuk lamented to God about the violence and other sinful behavior going on in Judah (Hab 1:4). He expressed his perplexing thoughts to God as to why He, seemingly, was allowing this terrible behavior to continue (Hab 1:2). He asked the Lord for an answer and vowed to wait patiently for the answer to his complaint (Hab 2:1).

As Habakkuk observed over 2600 years ago, many of us see things happening today which may prompt us to ask God why He is allowing them to continue. We are witnesses to the success of groups of people to keep God out of the schools and the government; the two places where He is really needed. When I was in elementary school many years ago, the principal would openly pray for children who had done terrible wrong things. If that occurred today, the principal most probably would be looking for another job shortly after the first prayer. Today we have many groups, and individuals existing in communities and the world, who thrive off of violence and terror. In recent years, we have seen many senseless terrorist attacks worldwide, and mass murders in the schools and other places with no remorse displayed by the ones doing the killing.

Like Habakkuk, there are many of us in the United States who, today, might ask why He allows senseless violence in the world, and lack of respect for His word in schools and the government to continue. But, also like Habakkuk, even though (the present may often seem depressing and bleak at times,) ... yet we will rejoice in the Lord. We know God has a plan for us as revealed by His covenant (with us) through Jesus Christ. Many of us have heard the quote about the Lord which says, "He may not come when you want Him to, but He's never late!" As it was with Habakkuk, He is the God of our salvation (Hab 3:18) and we will rejoice in this knowledge and continue to trust in Him, regardless of present events. We must continue to remember the Lord is sovereign, holy, and merciful. He knows the best path for us all, and in the end, all things will be made right according to His purpose and His time line.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Habakkuk 2:1-5
and Habakkuk 3:17-19. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




October 12 – I Know That My Redeemer Lives

Bible Lesson: Job 19:1-7, 23-29 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

We don't know who wrote the book of Job or the exact date of the writing. However, the writer depicts what real suffering can be like. Job was a blessed man and the Lord thought very highly of him (Job 1:8). He was financially successful, had a large family, and was respected in his community (Job 1:2-3). But, all of this was suddenly taken away from him and he did not know why. He was not aware of the reason the Lord had allowed Satan to cause Job so much grief.

Satan had told God, the only reason Job was such a righteous man was because of all the blessings he had received, and if those were taken away, he would curse the Lord (Job 1:11). God had great confidence in Job's endurance and righteousness, and allowed Satan to test these qualities in him (Job 1:12). Events then unfolded which took away Job's wealth and family. So much pain and grief was inflicted on Job, he questioned why God would allow him to suffer in such a way (Job 7:20). He cried out in anguish (Job 7:16), but, through it all, in the end he still looked forward to seeing the Lord with his own eyes (Job 19:27).

Bildad was one of the three people visiting Job while he was suffering. These were Job's friends (Job 2:11) and were there to comfort him. As someone once said, "With friends like these, who needs enemies!" Rather than showing great care and concern, many of the comments made to Job by Bildad (and the other two friends) mocked him and indicated he must be at fault because of his own wickedness (Job 19:5). In response to Bildad, Job defended himself (Job 19:5-6), and chastised him for what he had said (Job 19:3-4).

Even while in the midst of the pain and suffering (which Job thought was being wrongly applied to him) and the mockery of his "so called" friends, he had faith he would be vindicated and redeemed. He said, "But as for me, I know that my Redeemer lives ...." (Job 19:25) He never lost hope that one day he would be vindicated ... even if that time came after his death. He knew God was the only one who could answer why he was being so tormented. Today, we also have a Redeemer, and His name is Jesus. He redeemed us through his death and resurrection; paying our sin debt forever.

When we are in good health, enjoy financial stability, and generally are satisfied with how our life is going, it's much easier to smile and be in good cheer. But this is often a tenuous and frail existence. The book of Job expresses the frailty of human emotions. It shows how pain and suffering can cause the best of us to break down, lose our control, and give in to hopelessness and despair. As good as he was, Job was still human and as a result exhibited human emotions such as rage, disappointment, and despair. But, he never completely gave up, and he never cursed God as Satan thought he would (Job 1:11).

For many of us, it would take a lot less than what happened to Job to send us into a tailspin. However, during times of adversity and pain, the Lord wants us to turn to Him for help; through prayer. By doing so, we acknowledge His complete control over all in existence.

When considering the story of Job, one very interesting thing is what happened in the end. The Lord told the three friends of Job He was angry at them for their treatment of Job. God told them that Job would pray for them and He would accept his prayer on their behalf and have mercy on them (Job 42:8). This seemed to be a final test for someone who had gone through so much, to pray for the ones who had added to his torment with their uncaring words. This would be a difficult, if not impossible, task for many of us; to pray for those who had humiliated and mocked us in our most serious time of need. But, Job did this final thing, and at that point, the Lord restored his fortunes (Job 42:10).

Forgiveness of others is a hallmark of Christianity. Christ gave us the model to follow when He asked for the forgiveness of those who crucified Him (Luke 23:34) and taught us to continue to forgive (Matt 18:21-22).

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Job 19:1-7, 23-29
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




October 19 – I Will Call on God

Bible Lesson: Job 24:1, 9-12, 19-25  Key Verse: Psalm 55:16 KJV

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

The key verse for this lesson is, "As for me, I will call upon God; And the Lord shall save me." (Psalm 55:16 KJV). This is one of the few times our key verse is not contained in the reference scripture. However, this verse is relevant, considering Job's confusion as to why he was being made to suffer in such a way, while injustice and the wickedness seemed to flourish. The verse underscores the need for us to have undying faith in God's judgment in the face of what appears to be an unfair and unjust world.

Job questioned why the wicked go without being punished (Job 24:1). Then, later, he confirms his belief they will eventually be punished (Job 24:20). Some say, he was speaking out of sarcasm, but I choose to believe he was relying on faith that, in the end, the Lord will punish those who deserve to be punished. However, who that is, and what punishment is needed, is God's decision. We are all sinners, and deserve punishment. However, when we sin, we don't expect a lightning bolt to strike us immediately. Our gracious God gives us an opportunity to choose to repent on our own. Regardless of what we have done, we all have an opportunity to repent and be forgiven of our sins.

At some time in our life, we will experience our own personal version of Job's hardship. While, perhaps, not as severe, we will have multiple nagging problems at once. It may seem to us, that regardless of how much we pray, our problems continue to exist. Recently, I heard someone say, his hearing, eyesight, and hip are all going bad at the same time. In addition to all of that, or perhaps because of all of that, he suffers from depression. When asked how he was dealing with it, he said, "I deal with it by being grateful for all the years in the past the Lord gave me good health, and for the blessings He is giving me now." With that attitude, he has a good foothold on being saved, and the Lord is more interested in our soul being saved than fixing each of our problems or making every wrong right. Likewise, we should pray for a person's soul to be saved rather than being so concerned with the punishment WE HAVE DECIDED that person should receive.

Someone asked, why do we need to pray and ask the Lord for His help since He already knows our problems and that we need His help? Why, then, do we have to ask him for His help, through prayer? The answer is simple. The Lord wants us to rely on Him, especially during times of great need, and ask for His help. By doing so, we are showing reverence by acknowledging His complete control over all in existence. He wants us to say, "As for me, I will call upon God; And the Lord shall save me."

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Job 24:1, 9-12, 19-25
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.

For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the
World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible,the Wryer Study Bible (NIV), and the Standard Lesson Commentary.



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