Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated November 18, 2014)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the NewLivingTranslation.com site where the scripture will be displayed in the plain English of the NLT Bible.


November 2 – God's Glory Fills the Temple
Alternate Title – Seeking A Place Of Praise

Bible Lesson: Ezekiel 43:1-12 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

Ezekiel began his ministry as a prophet about seven years before the fall of Jerusalem. He had a vision that showed the sinfulness of people angered God (Ezek 8:6) and threaten to drive Him from the temple. Then, in his vision, the Lord decreed the destruction of Judah (Ezek 11:9), and His Glory departed the temple by the east gateway (Ezek 10:18-19). This departure would leave Judah and the temple in Jerusalem at the mercy of her enemies.

Before the fall of Jerusalem in 586 B.C., the Lord had provided a steady string of prophets such as Isaiah, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Habakkuk, who prophesied its destruction. But the people did not change their idolatrous ways. Just as with these prophets, Ezekiel warned the people of the coming destruction, but they did not heed his words either. Ezekiel was there when the Babylonians conquered the city, and destroyed the temple completely. Most of the people were either killed or sent into exile.

Just as with the previously mentioned prophets, Ezekiel also conveyed a message of the future revival of the Israelites. Many sermons have been based on the Valley of the Dry Bones; Ezekiel's vision of dry bones being given new life by God (Ezek 37). This signified the promise of the redemption and restoration of God's people of Israel, if they would repent. This message came to Ezekiel after the fall of Jerusalem, when all seemed to be lost.

In a vision, Ezekiel witnessed the return of God's Glory to the temple (Ezek 43:4), and It filled the temple (Ezek 43:5). This signified how the future could, and would be when the people would relinquish their sinful and idolatrous ways; the reason for His previous anger. A new level of holiness was required if the people wanted God to dwell with them henceforth. They would no longer repeat the sins which defiled His temple and His holy name (Ezek 43:7). The Lord told Ezekiel to describe this vision of how the future could be to the people so they would be ashamed of their sins (Ezek 43:10), and be convicted to a new level of holiness.

This is not only a message for the people during Ezekiel's lifetime, it is also a message to us. Sometimes, a church membership can lose its way and mainly focus on everything but God. One day, years ago, I was watching the popular game show, "Family Feud," when the question was "What do you look forward to when you go to church?" The contestants were asked to give the top five answers. The top five did not include "Worshiping God," or "The Sermon." However, the top five did include "leaving church" as one of the things people looked forward to!

When a person experiences "young love," (and sometimes, old love) just think how excited he or she gets when they will be in the presence of their love interest. If we are on Family Feud, what would our top five answers as to what we look forward to when we go to church? Do we go out of a sense of routine, social needs, because we like the music, or because we have a task to perform? If we want the Lord's glory to fill our church, we will go to church because we love the Lord and want to praise Him and express our appreciation to Him for all He has done for us.

When we see the lights are on inside a business, it's is an indication they are open for business. Metaphorically, imagine the Lord's glory is so strong in your church that it fills the church to the extent it is glowing. What would it mean? It would mean, your church is open for business - to do the Lord's work. All believers are indwelled by the Holy Spirit and, thereby represent a temple (1 Cor 6:19). Should our individual temples only be opened for business two hours out of the week. No. If we love the Lord, we will also want to live a life worthy of His faithfulness to us. Our lights will always be on and shining. "Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven." Matt 5:16, KJV.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Ezekiel 43:1-12
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




November 9 – The Altar Offers Hope
Alternate Title – Relishing Special Places

Bible Lesson: Ezekiel 43:13-21 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

Ezekiel's vision included God's description of the measurements of the new altar. This type temple Altar was a place where animal sacrifices were made for the people to atone for their sins. The animals had to be free of defects and they were killed at the altar. Gutters and collection areas were included to collect the blood from the slaughtered animals. There were sacrificial offerings where the animals were then completely burned up at the altar and other offerings where the animals were taken outside the temple area to be burned. The sacrificial system had a specific and complex set of rules, depending on the type of sacrifice being offered. A very good explanation of all the types of sacrifices made during the Mosaic period is located on the website agapebiblestudy.com.

The altar was important to God, otherwise He would not have gone through the trouble of revealing its measurements to Ezekiel. The Lord also gave him specific instructions on how to cleanse and sanctify the altar for holy use. Also included was a listing of the initial sacrifices needed for Him to accept His people (Ezek 43:27). This vision came to Ezekiel after the fall of Jerusalem, when the people's spirit was broken and they were despondent. The altar explanation is another example of instructions the people were given which brought hope to them.

This reminds me of something which happened to me in college. I was taking a very difficult civil engineering course in which my grade point average was hovering around "D" (or worse) as we approached final exams. My attitude was much like the Israelites; one of despondence. I did not want to repeat that difficult course which would then delay my graduation. I went to the professor and asked what the highest grade I could get out of this course called "Dynamics". I was hoping he would say "C." However, Dr. Mishu promptly replied with "A"... if I made the highest score on the final exam. Even though I had a hard task ahead, my feeling was one of hope and jubilation that he had that attitude of confidence in me.

I can only imagine the Israelites had a similar feeling of jubilation and hope because their exile was not God's last word for their people. A promising future awaited them if they did their part. Knowing that God had not abandoned them forever must have been a wonderful feeling. He was not only planning their restoration, but even had the details of the Altar which would go in the new temple. The measurements themselves are insignificant as compared to the fact that He had the measurements in the first place. They could relish this fact, because it meant He had great plans for His people in the future. All was not lost, and the redemption of the Israelites would eventually come, if they did their part in becoming obedient to God.

You may be wondering what happened to me with that college course 45 years ago? Well I spent 8 hours studying for that final exam while sitting on a bench in a nearby park. The exam was given that night and lasted for 3 hours. The next day, by chance, I saw the professor in the lobby of the engineering building, and asked him how I did. The words he responded with still resonate in my memory: "You made an 86. That was the highest score!" Imagine, hypothetically, if you run into God in the lobby of Heaven after your death, and ask Him how you did in life, what would be His answer?

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Ezekiel 43:13-21
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




November 16 – Water from the Sanctuary Gives Life
Alternate Title – Life Needs Water

Bible Lesson: Ezekiel 47:1-12 

Historical Background: To understand the significance of the life-giving river flowing into the Dead Sea, we must first understand the characteristics of the Dead Sea. It is theorized that at a time in history, the Dead Sea was fed by ocean water by one means or another, but that source ceased, and a self-contained and landlocked lake was left. Over the years, much more of the water evaporated than could be replenished by rain or any other source, leaving a larger content of salt.

We cannot be certain this theory is correct. But, what we do know is the water has a high concentration of salt; almost 10 times that of ocean water. No fish, vegetation, or other life can grow in the sea or on its banks. At one point, it was referred to as "The Salt Sea," but visitors started calling it the Dead Sea because of the lack of life in and around it. As a point of interest, the area of the Dead Sea is the lowest (sea level) point on earth.

What we shall learn from the lesson scripture: Before the fall of Jerusalem in 586 B.C., the Lord had inspired a steady string of prophets (such as Isaiah, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Habakkuk) to prophesy the destruction of Jerusalem and its temple because of the sinful acts of the Israelites. But the people did not change their sinful and idolatrous ways. Just as with other prophets, Ezekiel warned the people of the coming destruction, but they did not heed his words either. Ezekiel was there when the Babylonians conquered the city, and destroyed the temple completely. Most of the people were either killed or sent into exile.

Just as with the previously mentioned prophets, Ezekiel also conveyed a message of the future revival of the Israelites. In his vision, the temple had been restored to its central influence among the people, and God's Glory had returned to it (Ezek 43:4). The renewed influence of the temple then emanated from inside it, and flowed outward, giving new spiritual life and healing to the people who had turned away from the Lord. In the vision, this life-giving influence is, metaphorically, depicted as a river of life. All along its banks were many florishing trees (Ezek 47:7).

The river got deeper and larger the further away from the temple it traveled (Ezek 47:5). It even gave life to the lifeless Dead Sea (Ezek 47:8-9) which resulted in many fish living in it (Ezek 47:10). This metaphor can also be applied to the influence Jesus Christ had on the people of earth. The salvation and promise of eternal life which He brought to earth has grown from a relatively small number of people to the over 2 billion Christians in 200 countries we have today. It is like a river of life which continues to flow and expand. All those who wish to, can drink its waters and have eternal life. Those who reject Christ and the "symbolic" living water which originates from Him, will experience spiritual death and damnation. In John 4:14, Jesus refers to the water he offers as that which leads to eternal life.

One cannot help but notice the similarities between the vision of the river of life in the book of Ezekiel to John's vision in Revelations 22. If you are interested in this comparison, there is a very good commentary on it at this website: BibleGateway.com website.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Ezekiel 47:1-12
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




November 23 – Inheritance Marks a New Beginning
Alternate Title – A New Beginning

Bible Lesson: Ezekiel 47:13-23 

What we shall learn from the lesson scripture: When an inheritance is distributed, it is a sign that the old has ended and the new has begun. Not only that, but In general, those receiving the inheritance benefit from that which came before. As an example, if Aunt Susie has passed on and left money and property to you in her will, you will benefit from her thoughtfulness. When someone places your name in their Will, it is a sign they want to bless your future.

Because of the sinful ways of the Israelites, the Lord allowed the Babylonians to defeat them and send the remnants into exile. But, as we have learned in all the lessons for this month, this was not to be the end of God's chosen people. He had decreed a future for them. In Ezekiel's vision, the people would again return to their land and a new temple would be built. Their future would be blessed with an inheritance of land, just as He had promised their ancestors (Ezek 47:14, NIV).

A new level of holiness was required if the people wanted God to dwell with them henceforth. They would no longer repeat the sins which defiled His temple and His holy name (Ezek 43:7). The first time the Promised Land was divided, during the era of Moses, the size of each allotment was uneven and determined by several factors including special requests, size of the tribe, and sacred lots.

In the new division, all tribes would receive an equal share, as decreed by God (Ezek 47:14, NIV). There are some who might compare this equal division to a grandparent leaving each grandchild an equal inheritance so as to not show favoritism. The equal division could encourage family unity. Whether or not this type consideration was the case in Ezekiel's prophecy, one cannot say. However, we can say the Israelites (in this lesson) could use some family unity in their future. They all were descendents from the family of Israelites who had traveled the wilderness together for 40 years. But, then a division occurred, and ten tribes unified under one king (the combination of tribes was called Israel) and the tribes of Judah and Benjamin (referred to as just Judah) unified under another king who was a descendent of David. These two segments of tribes became hostile toward each other and actually did battle with each other. They were anything but one big happy family.

All this month, we have studied the promise of a new beginning for the Israelites, as prophesied by Ezekiel. But, this new beginning was to be in their future. During the time of Ezekiel's ministry, the people were defeated and sent into exile. All seemed to be lost. But, in their future, they would have a new temple, a new altar, and a newly divided land. But they would have to show a new level of holiness and repent of their sinful and idolatrous ways for this to come about.

Today, we can all look forward to a promising future because of the salvation Jesus brought to the earth over 2000 years ago. He brought a new beginning to the people - a new covenant between them and God. That covenant is salvation through the grace of God and is promised to all people ... not just the Israelites. But, to take advantage of this new beginning, we must declare Christ as our Lord and Savior and believe He was raised from the dead, on the third day. Then we will be Saved and receive eternal life.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Ezekiel 47:13-23
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




November 30 – Good News Brings Rejoicing
Alternate Title – Seeking Words Of Hope

Bible Lesson: Isaiah 52:1, 2, 7-12 

What we shall learn from the lesson scripture: Isaiah began his 40-year ministry as a prophet, over 150 years before the fall of Jerusalem at the hands of the Babylonians. His writings foretold not only the future defeat of Jerusalem (because of sinfulness), but also its revival ... all orchestrated by God.

Today's lesson focuses on the revival aspect of Isaiah's prophecies. The reference scripture describes what is sometimes referred to as the second exodus for the Israelites. The first exodus was from oppression in Egypt, and the second exodus would be from Babylon in the Israelites' future, according to the prophecy (Isa 48:20-21). Both the prophecy of defeat and that of the revival proved accurate.

I can only imagine, the Israelites who were eventually sent into exile, must have had some measure of comfort in knowing all was not lost. Whether or not they had Isaiah's prophecies with them as they went into exile, we can't be sure. But, even if they did not have access to Isaiah's writings, the prophet Ezekiel was alive during the fall of Jerusalem and provided similar promises of revival from the Lord while in exile with other Israelites. Much of his ministry was during his 22-year exile. He had an opportunity to speak, in person, to other Israelites who were in exile.

Knowing there is a promising future for your people is indeed good news (Isa 52:7) and would be reason to celebrate. Parents who raised a family in poverty would have reason to celebrate if they knew their children would be very successful. A person who had been kidnapped would have reason to rejoice, if he (or she) knew they would be rescued safely in the future. Even the New York Mets baseball team (in the first 7 years of existence) would had have reason to celebrate if they knew what was in their near future. They would go from having one of the worse records in baseball, for every year of existence in the early 60's, to winning the 1969 World Series. They were nicknamed, "The Miracle Mets."

As with the Mets and the Israelites, so it is with us. A person can go from being one of the most sinful and defeated people, to being one which is given a key to heaven's gate. Regardless of how deep in sin we are, Christ's death on the cross gave us a "get out of jail" card (as they say in the board game Monopoly). We are given a chance to declare Jesus as our Lord and Savior, repent of our sins, and be granted total forgiveness by God ... even if our human counterparts do not forgive us. That good news, alone, is reason to rejoice. The Apostle Paul used words from Isa 52:7 to proclaim the good news of salvation through Christ (Rom 10:15). Today, we continue to celebrate that good news, and rejoice in it.

The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Isaiah 52:1, 2, 7-12
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




December 7 – Worship Christ's Majesty
Alternate Title – Better Than Angels

Bible Lesson: Hebrews 1:1-9 

What we shall learn from the reference scripture:

Theologians are not sure who wrote the book of Hebrews, but a common belief is it was written as a sermon close to 67 AD. During that time, the Christians were persecuted by the Roman government and rejected by the traditional Jewish community. There was often a high price to pay for accepting Christ as their Lord and Savior. The book of Hebrews identifies and reaffirms the majesty and worthiness of the Son of God. It seeks to anchor the commitment of those who were believers and thereby subject to persecution, prejudice, and discrimination.

Imagine living as a Christian, under Roman authority, during a period of time when the laws and the government were against you and those like you. Under those conditions, it would be easy to lose focus and forget just how worthy Christ is for such a commitment. You might be tempted to give up on being a Christian. At such a time, an inspirational and foundational message (such as that of Hebrews) could help sustain your resolve.

The writer of Hebrews reminded the people of the superiority, importance, and deity of Jesus.

The writer expressed to the people why Christ is worthy of their worship. He is worthy to be worshipped, not only on earth, but in heaven. The Apostle John's visions, as recorded in the book of Revelation, states that millions of angels will declare Christ (the Lamb) is worthy (Rev 5:11-12).


The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Hebrews 1:1-9
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




December 21 – Give Glory to God
Alternate Title – Sing Spontaneous Joy

Bible Lesson: Luke 2:8-20 

Background: The Gospel of Luke was written by Luke, a Gentile, physician, and at times, a companion to the apostle Paul. His accounting was addressed to Theophilus, and he assures the reader his message was a result of careful investigation (Luke 1:1-4). Theologians are not exactly sure who Theophilus was, but believe he either requested or sponsored the research by Luke. The exact time of the the writing of this book is not known either, but is believed to have occurred decades after Jesus' crucifixion and during the period of Paul's ministry. However, taking into account various theories, the book of Luke could have been written anytime within AD 59-90.

What we shall learn from the lesson scripture: The announcement of the arrival of the Messiah (the birth of Jesus) was good news to the whole world, from the poor and oppressed, to those of a higher social and economic status. It's no wonder the arrival was announced not only to those of status; the wise men (Matt 2:1-2), but also to those of very little status; the shepherds (Luke 2:8). The realization of this birth was joyous news to both the wise men (Matt 2:10) and the shepherds (Luke 2:20).

All of us probably have heard a song we really like and have spontaneously found ourselves singing along with it as it played on the radio or some other medium. It's no wonder that the armies of heaven suddenly joined the angels (who were announcing the birth of Jesus) in praising God in joyous celebration of this glorious event. (Luke 2:13-14).

In contrasting the Magi (the wise men) and the shepherds, the Magi were well-off enough to bring gifts to the baby Jesus, whereas the shepherds were most likely very poor, and offered nothing but praise. Some people might say the shepherds were a "you too" group meaning the salvation Jesus brought was for everyone, including them. But, we can also say the shepherds were a "you especially" group in that they represented "the least, the less, and the lost" that were especially important to Jesus' ministry.

Those who have nothing to offer but praise and love for God will be as important in heaven as anyone. Those who acknowledge their inadequacy and seek strength through God (regardless of their financial status) are "the poor" referred to in Jesus' words, "God blesses you who are poor, for the Kingdom of God is yours" (Luke 6:20). All through His earthly ministry, Jesus helped those who were in great need of Him. It didn't matter if they were tax collectors (such as Matthew), or the outcast (such as those with leprosy). He came to earth for everyone (John 6:40, KJV). Announcing the birth of Jesus to the shepherds in such a glorious fashion, signified He indeed came to earth for everyone. Not only that, but it also signified He was to be a shepherd to the people. When one thinks of the Lord being a shepherd, the popular Scripture Psalm 23, KJV comes to mind.


The above link is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of
Luke 2:8-20
. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.

For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the
World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Wryer Study Bible (NIV), and the Standard Lesson Commentary. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in this page. The opinions expressed are his alone.



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