Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated February 8, 2016)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference Scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the NewLivingTranslation.com site where the Scripture will be displayed in the plain English of the NLT Bible.



February 7 – Passover
Alternate Title – Free at Last

Bible Lesson: Exodus 12:1-14

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

Probably every Christian has heard the word "Passover." Most, if not all, of us know it is a day which is observed in the Jewish community. The Gospels present the Last Supper as a Passover meal
in which Jesus and the disciples were present together (Matt 26:17). It is during this meal the Christian ordinance of Communion (also called the Lord's Supper) is based. During this meal, He shared bread and wine with the disciples which had a special significance. As He shared the bread Jesus told them to "..do this in remembrance of me" (Luke 22:19). In sharing the cup of wine, He said, "This cup which is poured out for you is the new covenant in My blood." (Luke 22:20). It is that new covenant on which we base our religion. Jesus paid our sin debt by sacrificing Himself on the cross for us.

Symbolically, there is a comparison between the original night of the Passover and the Crucifixion of Christ. On the night of the original Passover, in order for the Israelite households to be spared (passed over) by the Death Angel, blood from a sacrificial lamb had to be applied to the door frames (Exodus 12:7). Symbolically, Jesus is like a sacrificial lamb who took our place in payment for our sins. Through His one-time sacrifice, no other sacrifice is needed. When we acknowledge Him as our Lord and Savior, we become His own and are spared and our sins are forgiven by the grace of God. This is the new covenant Jesus spoke of during the Last Supper (Luke 22:20).

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Exodus 12:1-14.





February 14 – Festival of Weeks
Alternate Titles – Feast of Weeks; A Bountiful Harvest

Bible Lesson: Leviticus 23:15-22

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

The Old Testament gives insight into God's character; what He considers good and what He considers bad. We know He wants us to appreciate the things He does for us and to show that gratitude in a tangible way. Part of living a godly life is to love each other (Lev 19:18 NIV) and look after the poor (Deut 15:11 ESV).

In ancient Israel, the sacrifices presented to Him and the festivals were a way of showing gratitude or asking for forgiveness for sins. All sacrifices had to be excellent—the best grain and animals with no blemishes. There were two basic types of sacrifices: a type for atoning for sin (forgiveness for sins) and a type for celebrating and recognizing the relationship between the people and God. The content of the Festival of Weeks centered basically around the latter type. It is still celebrated in the Jewish community, but is now called Shavu'ot.

Beginning on the second day of Passover, 49 days are counted (7 full weeks). The following day is the 50th and initiates the Festival of Weeks. Initially, it was a celebration for showing gratitude for the first harvest of wheat (Lev 23:17) and thusly, offerings came from the crops and were given to God's representatives (the Priests) as a sacrifice. Later, the Festival of Weeks also became a celebration for the day God gave them the Torah at Mount Sinai. In Judaism, the "Ten Commandments" is considered a foundational part of the Torah; the first of 613 commandments given to the Jews by God.

The festivals and sacrifices made by the Israelites foreshadow Christian lives today. We learn to show gratitude to God for our blessings and for what we have received. By giving to the church our tides and offerings and living a godly life, we acknowledge it is God that is responsible for our successes and everything we have (Romans 11:36). As the Israelites were commanded, we also should be kind to the poor and make provisions for them (Lev 23:22).
It is our duty to remember these obligations and also the duty of our spiritual leaders of today to remind us of these things.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Leviticus 23:15-22.





February 21 – Day of Atonement
Alternate Titles – Jesus Paid Our Debt; A Clean Slate

Bible Lesson: Leviticus 16:1-11

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

The Day of Atonement was one of the most important spiritual days for the people of Israel. It was the only day which required fasting and was a Sabbath day for the whole nation; no one was to do any work (Lev 23:28-29). This was a day of purification; when the sins of the people were atoned for. Even today, it is the holiest day in Judaism and is now called Yom Kippur.

Aaron, Moses' brother, was the first high priest of the Israelites. The Scripture contains specific details about the process he would have to go through to atone for the sins of the Israelites and to purify the Tabernacle—including the most holy places within it (Lev 16:16). It is important and revealing that Aaron himself was not without sin. He also had to atone for his own sins (Lev 16:6). Therefore, for all the people, atonement removed the obstacle of sin which would otherwise inhibit proper worship of God.

The animal sacrifices made during the Day of Atonement were given in the place of the worshipper (a life for a life). The animal's life was given so the worshipper would be spared. The blood of the animal represened its life and is offered as a substitute for the life of the worshipper (Lev 17:11, 1:4).

The requirements of the Day of Atonement represented God's rules in order for sins to be forgiven. Christians are under a new covenant and do not have give animal sacrifices to be forgiven of our sins. We do not have to go through an earthly priest, as our representative, to communicate with God. We can speak to Him in prayer through our heavenly representative— Jesus. Often we end our prayers with, "In Jesus' name" knowing we can go to the Father through Him (John 14:6). We do not have to sacrifice animals to take our place in atonement for sins, because Jesus was sacrificed on the cross and then resurrected, to pay our sin debt forever and to make us right with God (Romans 4:25). Our sins are now forgiven through the grace of God.

Note: We should mention the fact that the Jews do not presently practice animal sacrifice. The most common reason why animal sacrifices were stopped is there is no holy temple in which to offer sacrifices. The last temple was destroyed in 70AD by the Romans. It is unlikely another one will be built since the Temple Mount property in Jerusalem is not under the complete control of the Jews. Also, in this day of modern thinking and sensitivities, it would be difficult to imagine animal sacrifices being reinstituted by the Jews.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Leviticus 23:15-22.





February 28 – Festival of Tabernacles
Alternate Titles – Heritage And Hope; Feast of Booths

Bible Lesson: Leviticus 23:33-43

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

God gave instructions to the ancient Israelites on how to atone for their sins so they would be suitable for a relationship with Him. He graciously told them how to worship Him, including the requirements listed in Leviticus. The various festivals, and observances served as part of worship in that they were centered around expressing gratitude to God for all He had done for them. Not only that, but these type events served to remind future generations of the goodness of God and how He has been faithful to the people.

As Christians, we are to show gratitude to God each day for all He has done for use. We also observe certain special days and events in which we show gratitude to God for the faithfulness and goodness shown to us. Christmas and Easter, as well as communion and baptism, serve to remind us of the goodness of God and the sacrifices He made in order for us to be saved. They also serve to teach new generations of these same things.

During the Festival of Tabernacles (also called Festival of Shelters), the Israelites were supposed to live in temporary shelters for the seven-day duration of the festival. This was to commemorate how they had to live in temporary shelters when God first saved them from bondage in Egypt (Lev 23:43). Today, this observance is referred to by the Jewish name, "Sukkot." The shelter is called a Sukkah and various models can even be bought on the Internet from Amazon. Today, there are some Jews who will eat and/or sleep in a Sukkah during the festival week, but the general trend is they will sleep indoors. For more information on this subject, from a Jewish point of view, go to this site.

The various sacrifices and offerings made during the festival each day are listed in Numbers 29:12-34. If you are interested in further information on what happened to the animals, grain, and other items given in the sacrifices, go to this site.

The festivals and sacrifices made by the ancient Israelites foreshadow Christian lives today. In our culture, we are admonished to show gratitude to God for our blessings and for what we have received. By living a godly life in obedience to Him, we acknowledge it is God who is in control of our future, and it is He that is responsible for our successes and everything we have (Romans 11:36).
It is our duty to observe these obligations and celebrate His goodness, especially for the benefit of new generations.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Leviticus 23:33-43.



March 6 – Powerful Faith
Alternate Title – Flame and Blood

Bible Lesson: Mark 9:14-29

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

The synopsis for this lesson will be posted on or before February 11, 2016
.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Mark 9:14-29.

For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Wryer Study Bible (NIV), and the Standard Lesson Commentary. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in this page. The opinions expressed are his alone.



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