Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated November 19, 2018)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference Scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the New Living Translation version of the reference Scripture. This version is easier to understand than some of the other translations.


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November 4 – A Troubled Birth
Alternate Title – Siblings' Rivalry


Bible Lesson:
Genesis 25:19-34 (KJV)


Key verse:
Genesis 25:23 (KJV) - "And the LORD said unto her, Two nations are in thy womb, and two manner of people shall be separated from thy bowels; and the one people shall be stronger than the other people; and the elder shall serve the younger."


What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

In the lesson from last week, Sarah did not have a child with Abraham—her husband—until she was 90 years old. The son was named Isaac. After he matured, the Lord led him to Rebekah to be his wife (Genesis 24:50). As it turned out, Rebekah was not able to conceive, just as had been the case with Sarah, her mother-in-law. But, rather than taking matters into their own hands (as Abraham and Sarah had done with Hagar), Isaac prayed to God and the Lord blessed them with twins (Genesis 25:21).

Even before the twin sons were born, they struggled against each other in Rebekah's womb. She was so concerned about this that she asked the Lord why this struggling was occurring. The Lord answered her in the form of a prophecy: "The sons in your womb will become two nations. From the very beginning, the two nations will be rivals. One nation will be stronger than the other; and your older son will serve your younger son." (Genesis 25:23 NLT).

Even though the two sons were twins, Esau was the first to enter the world from the womb and was therefore the firstborn. The firstborn son was entitled to the birthright - to be designated as the head of the family after the father died. Also, the son with the birthright would receive a double portion of the inheritance from his father's estate, presumably because he was also responsible for supporting the mother after the father died.

One day, when Esau came back from hunting, he was extremely hungry and asked Jacob for some of the stew he was cooking. Jacob bargained with him and said he would give him some stew if he gave him his birthright. Esau was so hungry that he agreed and thus gave away his birthright.

The father's blessing was different from the birthright. The blessing was a pronouncement made by the father to his sons of what he envisioned for their lives. Normally, the most valued blessing would be given to the firstborn son. But, as we will discover in the lesson for next week, Jacob and Rebekah tricked Isaac into giving Jacob the most favored blessing: "May many nations become your servants. May you be the master of your brothers. May all your mother's sons bow low before you. All who curse you are cursed, and all who bless you are blessed." (Genesis 27:29 NLT). Isaac thought he was giving the blessing to Esau, but his poor eyesight and other measures taken by Jacob and Rebekah deceived him.

Losing both his birthright and blessing to his younger brother, Jacob, no doubt added to the rivalry between Jacob and Esau, because Esau was so mad he threaten to kill Jacob (Genesis 27:41). Also, the parents appear to have "played favorites" in that Rebekah was drawn to Jacob while Isaac appears to favor Esau. Having a parent who favors your brother can cause heartache and anger between the two brothers. Perhaps the parents were only being human—liking one son over the other simply because of the specific mannerisms and interests of one compared to the other.

Those of us who have been a party to sibling rivalry know one child can grow up disliking the other simply because the other did better in school or some other activity and, as a result, got more praise. The challenge to parents is to let all their children know they are special to them.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Genesis 25:19-34

The key verse: Genesis 25:23 (NLT) - "And the LORD told her, 'The sons in your womb will become two nations. From the very beginning, the two nations will be rivals. One nation will be stronger than the other; and your older son will serve your younger son.'"





November 11 – Jacob Receives Isaac's Blessing
Alternate Title – Jacob's Deception


Bible Lesson:
Genesis 27:5-10, 18-19, 21-29 (KJV)


Key verse:
Genesis 27:23 (KJV) - "And he discerned him not, because his hands were hairy, as his brother Esau's hands: so he blessed him. "


What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

Merriam-Webster dictionary defines deception this way: "The act of causing someone to accept as true or valid what is false or invalid." Then, by definition, a purposeful lie is always deception. In Jacob's case, this definition fits what happens in the lesson perfectly.

The lesson for today involves a deceitful plan conceived by Rebekah to trick her husband, Isaac, into giving his most valued blessing to their son, Jacob. Isaac wanted to give the blessing to Jacob's twin brother, Esau, but Rebekah's scheme was designed to fool Isaac into thinking he was giving the blessing to Esau when, in fact, he was blessing Jacob. In the end, because of his poor eyesight, Rebekah's deceptive plan, and Jacob's lies, Isaac gave the irrevocable blessing to Jacob and not Esau (Genesis 27:33).

Some students of the Bible say there is a theory why we should give Rebekah the benefit of the doubt. They say the Lord had told her before the birth of her two sons that "Two nations are in your womb...the older will serve the younger" (Genesis 25:23 NIV). The theory goes on to suggest she created the deception in a misguided attempt to bring about what the Lord had told her. But we must remember that lying is not the way of the Lord and He surely did not tell her to teach her son to lie.

No doubt, the Lord's will and desires for Jacob would have been accomplished without this deception. Isaac was a man in God's plan, but he was not God. His blessings were his desires—hopefully influence by God—but the Lord has final control. The New Living Translation Bible puts the reality of God's control in a somewhat colloquial, but interesting interpretation: "We may throw the dice, but the LORD determines how they fall." (Proverbs 16:33). In other words, regardless of our actions, God remains in control of the outcome.

One factor which made the series of events in our text possible is that Isaac thought he was so old he could die any day (Genesis 27:1-2), prompting him to lay out the plans and desires he had for the future of his sons before it was too late. No doubt, his family probably believed he was truly about to die. No one there knew this urgency was not needed, because he would live at least 20 more years*.

During this period of Biblical history, the father's blessing was highly valued. It had real consequences concerning who would be in charge after his death and inheritance rights. This was the pronouncement made by the father to his sons of what he envisioned for their future lives. Normally, the most valued blessing would be given to the firstborn son. But in this case, Jacob and Rebekah tricked Isaac into giving Jacob the most favored blessing:

"May many nations become your servants. May you be the master of your brothers. May all your mother's sons bow low before you. All who curse you are cursed, and all who bless you are blessed." (Genesis 27:29 NLT).

Isaac thought he was giving this blessing to Esau, but his poor eyesight and the measures taken by Jacob and Rebekah deceived him. Isaac used all available senses (taste, sight, touch, smell, and hearing), to determine it was Esau before giving him the blessing. His eyesight wasn't of much help since he was nearly blind. Isaac used his sense of hearing and became suspicious because the voice sounded more like Jacob's than Esau's (Genesis 27:22).

Besides the sense of sight and the sense of hearing, Isaac also used his three other senses to make sure he was not being tricked: the sense of touch (Genesis 27:21); the sense of taste (Genesis 27:25); the sense of smell (Genesis 27:26-27). But Rebekah's plan of deception had taken into account all his senses (Genesis 27:6-17).

When Esau discovered what had happened, he was furious (Genesis 27:36) and declared he would kill Jacob after his father died and the period of mourning was over (Genesis 27:41); not knowing that Isaac would in fact live for many more years. There was ironic payment for Jacob's deception in his future, because he would himself be deceived by his uncle Laban when he went to stay with him.

Laban was Rebekah's brother and she wanted Jacob to go stay with him to escape Esau's plan to kill him (Genesis 27:42-43). But she told Isaac a different story which amounted to more deception. She manipulated Isaac into sending Jacob away to avoid him marrying one of the local Hittite women (Genesis 27:46).

Jacob worked seven years for Laban as payment for being given Laban's daughter, Rachel, to be his wife. But Laban tricked Jacob and gave him Leah instead on the honeymoon night. Jacob had to agree to then work another seven years as payment for also receiving Rachel as his second wife. So Jacob was the victim of deception, which some might say was poetic justice because of the deception of his father Isaac, in which he played a significant role.


[*Note: After Jacob fled his home for fear his brother would kill him, he worked for his uncle Laban for 20 years (Genesis 31:38). It was well after his time with Laban that his father, Isaac, died. Therefore we know Isaac did not die when he thought he was about to; at which time he had given Jacob the blessing by mistake.]

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Genesis 27:5-10, 18-19, 21-29

The key verse: Genesis 27:23 (NLT) - "But he did not recognize Jacob, because Jacob's hands felt hairy just like Esau's. So Isaac prepared to bless Jacob."









November 18 – Jacob Forms a Relationship with God
Alternate Title – Jacob's Dream


Bible Lesson:
Genesis 28:10-22 (KJV)


Key verse:
Genesis 28:15 (KJV) - "And, behold, I am with thee, and will keep thee in all places whither thou goest, and will bring thee again into this land; for I will not leave thee, until I have done that which I have spoken to thee of."


What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

God had already told Abraham that the covenant line would be passed to Isaac. He did this before the birth of Isaac (Genesis 17:19) and also after the birth (Genesis 21:12). The lesson for today will show God's affirmation that His covenant with Abraham would be passed on from Isaac to Jacob. We will see that God looked after and blessed Jacob regardless of his weaknesses.

Jacob deceived Isaac to gain the most favored blessing which Isaac really wanted to give to his other son Esau. As a result, Esau threaten to kill Jacob. Jacob's mother, Rebekah, wanted him to go and live with his uncle Laban until Esau's anger subsided (Genesis 27:44-45). Rather than using this motivation to convince Isaac to send Jacob away, instead she convinced him to send Jacob away for a different reason: to find a wife. She told Isaac she did not want Jacob to marry one of the local Hittite women (Genesis 27:46).

Before Jacob left on his journey, Isaac blessed Jacob again but this time with perhaps the greatest blessing of all: "May God pass on to you and your descendants the blessings he promised to Abraham" (Genesis 28:4). He sent him to the region of Paddan-Aram of which Harran is a part. He was told to find a wife there among his uncle Laban's daughters. So this part of Rebekah's plan also worked very well. Jacob was being sent to where she wanted him to go and to whom she wanted him to be with.

During his trip from Beersheba to Harran, he had to spend the night near the village of Luz. He did not stay in a hotel or any other safe living establishment. We know this because the text says he used a rock for a pillow (Genesis 28:11 NIV).

We can only imagine the frame of mind Jacob was in. He was essentially on the run from his brother, Esau, who had vowed to kill him. He had just recently lied profusely to his father in order to deceive him. As far as we know, he had to spend the night alone.

He was not an outdoorsman like his brother. He was more of a homebody and more comfortable in and around the tents (Genesis 25:27). But this night, there was no mention of a tent. It sounded very much like he was just sleeping in the open (Genesis 28:11 KJV). For Jacob, to undertake a trip such as this must have been somewhat frightening to him.

He had a dream involving God and His angels. This dream would reaffirm Jacob was next in the covenant line to receive the covenant promises God made to Abraham. He dreamed of a ladder which reached from earth to Heaven. He saw the angels of God going up and down the ladder (Genesis 28:12 KJV). [NIV, NLT, and some other translations call the ladder a stairway.]

At the top of the ladder stood the Lord who initiated the conversation and essentially passed on to Jacob the covenant promises he had made to Abraham. This included the promised land would belong to Jacob's descendants (Genesis 28:13) and that these descendants will be great in number. He promised that all the families of the earth will be blessed through him and his descendants (Genesis 28:14). God promised to be with Jacob and to protect him wherever he went (Genesis 28:15).

When he awoke, he realized this location was no ordinary place. He called it the house of God and the gate to heaven (Genesis 28:17 NIV). He renamed this location Bethel, though the name of the nearby village was Luz (Genesis 28:19). Bethel means, in Hebrew, "house of God." He took the stone he had used as a pillow and set it up and poured oil on it to commemorate what had taken place in his dream.

But his immediate challenge was to complete the approximately 550-mile journey from Beersheba to Harren. He vowed his fatefulness to God if He would watch over him and provide for his needs on this difficult journey (Genesis 28:20-21 NIV).

Even though Jacob had demonstrated he was far from being perfect, God continued to use him for His purposes. Because of this fact, we should never stop working for the Lord even though we don't feel adequate. Satan would love for us to quit helping further God's kingdom on earth.

Jacob's ladder from his dream has great significance to Christians. Jesus described Himself in the same manner as the Bible describes the ladder in Jacob's dream. We find in John 1:51 KJV these words from Christ: "And he saith unto him, verily, verily, I say unto you, Hereafter ye shall see heaven open, and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of man."

When we think of Jesus as the ladder from earth to heaven, we are reminded that Christ is our only path to God and Heaven. He is the connection from us to God. When we sing the great hymn of the church, "We are climbing Jacob's Ladder," we are reminded that Jesus said in John 14:6 NIV:

"I am the way and the truth and the life.
No one comes to the Father except through me."

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Genesis 28:10-22

The key verse: Genesis 28:15 (NLT) - "What's more, I am with you, and I will protect you wherever you go. One day I will bring you back to this land. I will not leave you until I have finished giving you everything I have promised you."






November 25 – God Blesses Jacob and His Family
Alternate Title – God's Blessing


Bible Lesson:
Genesis 30:22-32, 43 (KJV)


Key verse:
Genesis 30:22 (KJV) - "And God remembered Rachel, and God hearkened to her, and opened her womb."


What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

The lesson text starts with God granting Rachel's desire to have a son (Genesis 30:22). She became pregnant and gave birth to her son, Joseph (Genesis 30:23-24). He would become the most noteworthy of all of Jacob's 12 sons. He would be sold into slavery by his jealous brothers but would rise to be second only to Pharaoh in control of Egypt.

The Lord blessed Jacob with sons from his wife, Leah, and her maid, and also his other wife, Rachel, and her maid. Thus his sons came from a total of four women. The nation of Israel descended from his sons just as the Lord had promised. Sadly, Rachel died as a result of complications from the birth of her second son, Benjamin. Laban had deceived Jacob which resulted in him working an additional 7 years so he could have Rachel as his wife. This made a total of 14 years he had worked in order to have Rachel as his wife.

The Lord blessed Jacob with large flocks so that the day came that he was exceedingly prosperous (Genesis 30:43 NIV). The way this came about started with Jacob telling Laban he wanted to leave and take his wives and children with him. Laban pleaded with him stay because he believed the Lord had blessed him because of Jacob's presence (Genesis 30:27). Laban said for Jacob to tell him what wages he wanted and he would pay it (Genesis 30:28).

Jacob said he only wanted the sheep and goats which were speckled or spotted. Normally, these would not be numerous in a flock. Since this would not be a great number, Laban agreed. However, Laban was notorious for changing his agreements with Jacob.

But before long, Jacob realized the Lord was going to bless him regardless of which part of the flock Laban agreed to give him. In a dream, the angel of the Lord told him this would happen (Genesis 31:12). As an example, if Laban said he could have the speckled ones out of the flock, then the whole flock would produce speckled ones (Genesis 31:8). In the end, the Lord blessed Jacob with large flocks and also with male and female servants (Genesis 30:43).

When we wake up in the morning and can breathe and are in our right mind, this is a blessing from God. Every new day in our life is a blessing, and God continues to bless us even though we are all sinners. Jacob had his weaknesses and shortcomings, but the Lord continued to watch over him to fulfill His promises.

In his past, Jacob had used lies and deception within his family. He used his brother's intense hunger one day to obtain his brother's birthright in exchange for food (Genesis 25:32-33). Also, he was the chief player in his mother's devious scheme to obtain his father's most valued blessing even though his father wanted to give the blessing to his brother, Esau.

In today's lesson, Jacob was up against his uncle Laban; someone who was devious and cunning. In addition to facing such people in our everyday activities, we can even find them in the church. They have their own agenda concerning how the church should be run and what the church should spend its resources on. They use deception or bullying, just as did Laban, to further their vision and personal desires.

When our actions and personal desires unfairly affect the mission or wellbeing of the church, we have become a "Laban." As Christians, we should understand our words and actions have real consequences and can hurt or hinder other Christians. We may not have control over the actions of others, but we do have control over our own actions. We can stop being a "Laban."

As we go through the difficulties of life, we will be faced with many different types of "Labans." We should not be discouraged because "... the Lord is faithful, and He will strengthen you and protect you from the evil one" (2 Thessalonians 3:3).


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Genesis 30:22-32, 43

The key verse: Genesis 28:15 (NLT) - "Then God remembered Rachel's plight and answered her prayers by enabling her to have children."








December 2 – Love and Obey God


Bible Lesson:
Deuteronomy 6:1-9 (KJV)


Key verse:
Deuteronomy 6:5 (KJV) - "And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might. "


What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

In our lesson for today, the Israelites were close to the time when they would cross the River Jordan and go into the land God promised Abraham's descendants would receive (Genesis 6:10). In the reference text, Moses was in the process of counseling them to have the right attitude; one of obedience to, and love for, God. He said for them to take a great effort to remind themselves and their children of the Lord's commands (Genesis 6:7). They should commit themselves wholeheartedly to the commands (Genesis 6:6).

At this time, their level of commitment to God was extremely important because the Israelites were about to go up against a fearsome opponent in order to take ownership of their land—the land which the Lord had promised them (Genesis 7:17-18). In other words, they had to fight for the land but would have the advantage of God being on their side.

This was not the time to disobey God or show lack of faith in Him. Moses cautioned the people to do not "test" the Lord (Genesis 6:16) as they did when they complained at Massah about the lack of water (Exodus 17:2). They were cautioned to continue to obey God even after the battles are over and they have control of the land. (Deut 8:20).

The way the Israelites were instructed to relate to the Lord is our model for our relationship to Him today. We are to love and obey Him wholeheartedly (Deut 6:5). We are to be forever grateful to God for our success in life and not claim our achievements as solely accomplished by our own strength (Genesis 8:17-18).


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Deuteronomy 6:1-9

The key verse: Deuteronomy 6:5 (NLT) - "And you must love the LORD your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your strength."





December 9 – Love and Serve


Bible Lesson:
Joshua 24:1-3A, 13-15, 21-24 (KJV)


Key verse:
Joshua 24:15 (KJV) - "And if it seem evil unto you to serve the LORD, choose you this day whom ye will serve; whether the gods which your fathers served that were on the other side of the flood, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land ye dwell: but as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD."


What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

The sysnopsis for this lesson will be posted on or before Thursday, November 22, 2018


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Joshua 24:1-3A, 13-15, 21-24

The key verse: Joshua 24:15 (NLT) - "But if you refuse to serve the LORD, then choose today whom you will serve. Would you prefer the gods your ancestors served beyond the Euphrates? Or will it be the gods of the Amorites in whose land you now live? But as for me and my family, we will serve the LORD."








For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Standard Lesson Commentary, and Commentary by David Guzik. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in this page. He is the author of the book: "The Book of the Holy Spirit: Joyful living." Any opinions expressed or writings on this page are his responsibility.



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