Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated July 1, 2015)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference Scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the NewLivingTranslation.com site where the Scripture will be displayed in the plain English of the NLT Bible.



July 5 – No Rest for the Wicked
Alternate Title – You've Got To Change Your Evil Ways

Bible Lesson: Micah 2:4-11 

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

Although Micah prophesied mostly after Amos, their prophecies came during roughly the same historical era of Israel. As with Amos, Micah also witnessed the corruption in Israel due to the abuse of power by the wealthy and powerful over those who had little or no power
(Micah 2:2, 2:8-9). Just as with Amos (Amos 8:10), God spoke through Micah and told the people they would be punished (Micah 2:3). Those who had been abusing their power would be humbled and their ill-gotten possessions taken from them (Micah 2:4).

The people had become lackadaisical; they took their favored status in life for granted. They did not consider their land could, or would be taken from them (Micah 2:6).
But God had other plans; He had decided they would be punished and the land would indeed be taken from them (Micah 2:4).

Perhaps we have fallen victim to the same type thinking. Are we taking for granted that our environment will remain relatively the same; there will always be highways and freeways; always be restaurants and movie theaters? We live in a realm where we feel comfortable in praying for the good things in our future, while we continue to live without fear that we are headed for God's punishment. We prefer to hear how good things are in store for us as opposed to punishment by God, just as Micah proclaimed about Israel (Micah 2:11).

There are very few people who believe the United States will cease to exist in their lifetime ... as no doubt the Romans felt about their future as well. As a world, we do not attribute many of the horrible things now happening to be as a result of God's unhappiness with us. Perhaps we do not attribute the wars, and atrocities in our present world as punishment from God. No doubt, there are some who attribute the fact that millions of people have died from AIDS to be just an unfortunate turn of events, and not punishment. Many of us have arrived at a point where we consider bad things which happen to us as just bad luck; in many cases, we do not even consider God is punishing us. We love God, but do we also fear Him (Luke 12:5)?

Prophets like Amos and Micah not only warned the people in Israel of God's impending punishment for their oppression of the poor and powerless, but their message is speaking to us today as well. The question is, will be do a better job of listening and changing our ways than did the Israelites?


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Micah 2:4-11 . When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




July 12 – No Tolerance for Corrupt Officials
Alternate Title – Public Trust Betrayed

Bible Lesson: Micah 3:5-12 

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

Our lesson scripture is an indictment on the leaders of Israel as those who oppress or mislead the people and used their gifts and talents for their own selfish benefit (Micah 6:11).
False prophets are included in the leaders of Israel who Micah spoke against. Their predictions of the future would depend on what they were given or not given in return (Micah 3:5).

We know that in a very few years after the time Micah was a prophet, the Northern Kingdom of Israel was completely conquered and its city of Samaria was destroyed as he had prophesied (Micah 1:6).

He prophesied the same would happen to Jerusalem because the leaders were building the city on a foundation of murder and corruption (Micah 3:10) as opposed to following God's ways. Because of this corruption, the people would lose Jerusalem and the city would be destroyed. This would be like plowing under a field (Micah 3:12) in preparation for new planting.

Eventually, the southern kingdom of Judah was also be conquered and city of Jerusalem was also destroyed (as Micah prophesied). Later, a remnant of the Israelites would be allowed to return to Jerusalem - like new seed being sown in the cultivated field.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Micah 3:5-12 . When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




July 19 – What the Lord Requires
Alternate Title – What God Wants

Bible Lesson: Micah 6:3-8 

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

Simply stated, to sin against God is to do something which God doesn't want you to do.
Under the old covenant, to atone for their sins, the Israelites presented offerings of various types. But their basic sinful behavior continued, which provoked punishment by the Lord. No longer would offerings (Micah 6:6-7) be all which was necessary; the Lord wanted and required them to change their sinful ways (Micah 6:8) and stop their dishonest and unfair practices (Micah 6:12). In essence, He wanted them to repent which exhibits sincere regret and change in behavior. Since they had not done so, punishment was declared by God (Micah 6:13).

Under the new covenant, through Jesus' sacrifice, we are forgiven of our sins through the grace of God. However, we too must repent of our sins and seek to not continue to repeat the same sins (Hebrews 10:26). We should turn from sinful ways (2Chronicle 7:14) and repent (Luke 13:3). Asking God for forgiveness is not a game of words, but a game of action.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Micah 6:3-8 . When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




July 26 – God's Matchless Mercy
Alternate Title – Mercy Me

Bible Lesson: Micah 7:14-20 

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:

The reference scripture is one of hope and restoration. Even though Micah's prophecy told of God's punishment on a sinful Israel (Micah 2:3), he also prophesied restoration and forgiveness by God.

The punishment did come and the people were exiled as predicted (Micah 1:6, 3:12). The Northern Kingdom of Israel was the first to go in the 700s BC (conquered by the Assyrians), followed by the Southern Kingdom of Judah (at the hands of the Babylonians) in the early 500s BC. In the late 500s BC, God prompted the Persians to allow a remnant of the Israelites to return to Jerusalem and rebuild the Temple. There are some biblical historians who also include the destruction of Jerusalem (and the Temple) by the Romans in 70 AD as punishment by God for their sin. Modern Israel, as we know it, did not come into unification until 1967.

Regardless of what we may include or exclude from the punishment, we know that Israel was punished by God numerous times for idolatry and other sins. But we also know God displayed His mercy and forgiveness by allowing a remnant of the people to survive and eventually prosper, as the prophecies promised.

Micah prayed that God would continue in the future to lead and protect Israel as a shepherd would for his flock (Micah 7:14). He prayed Israel would be restored to their status back when they inherited from God fertile lands such as Bashan and Gilead. The prophet exclaimed God's answer as "yes" - he would restore, bless and protect Israel with His power (Micah 7:15) in the future. Micah proclaimed God's mercy on the people, for He would forgive them in the future and restore a remnant (Micah 7:18).

One especially interesting verse is verse 17: "They shall lick the dust like a serpent, they shall move out of their holes like worms of the earth..." (KJV). This verse is part of Micah's prayer and praise. It exclaims the restoration of Israel would be through the magnificent power of God. Enemy nations would be humbled by the power of God. Crawling and eating (or licking) dusk are metaphors representing defeat and humiliation of the enemy through God's power and protection.

As He did for the Israelites, so will God do for us. His mercy is matchless; He will forgive us for our sins. He loves us so much that He sent His son to die on the cross as a sacrifice for our sins. As with the Israelites, we may be punished for doing wrong, but we are assured He is ready and willing to forgive those who ask for forgiveness and repent.

Footnote: God selected Israel to be His chosen people. He rescued and blessed them with His goodness. But He also punished them when they did wrong. The Bible, on which we rely (both Old and New Testaments), is largely written by or about the Israelites. It details what God wants of all of us, but it specifically shows what can happen to us when we sin. The Israelites did not have a monopoly on sin - all people sin against God. However, through the travels and history of the Israelites, God demonstrated his sovereignty, faithfulness, control, and mercy for the whole world.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Micah 7:14-20 . When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.


For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Wryer Study Bible (NIV), and the Standard Lesson Commentary. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in this page. The opinions expressed are his alone.



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