Sunday School Lessons
Mrs. Daisy B. Scott - Superintendent
(Updated July 29, 2015)

Sunday School classes start at 9:30 AM every Sunday.


The lesson segments include a synopsis of the lesson and a link to AudioBible.com where the reference Scripture will be played in audio and displayed on the screen.  If your computer cannot play the file, download a free copy of RealPlayer at the Real.com site. Also in each lesson segment will be a link to the NewLivingTranslation.com site where the Scripture will be displayed in the plain English of the NLT Bible.



August 2 – A Redeemer in Zion
Alternate Title – The Rescuer Comes

Bible Lesson: Isaiah 59:15-21 

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

Our reference text specifically describes how God will rescue (redeem) the Israelites from exile and captivity by the Babylonians. However, when the word "redeemer" is mentioned in reference to the Bible, the subject of Ruth and Naomi may come to mind. These were two women who were in desperate need because they didn't have a source of livelihood after their husbands had died. Ruth vowed to worship the God of Israel and went with her mother-in-law Naomi back to Naomi's homeland.

Because of her decision, Ruth later met and married Boaz (a wealthy land owner). He committed to being Naomi's and Ruth's redeemer; rescuing and delivering them from financial ruin. This union resulted in the birth of a son, Obed, who was the grandfather of King David. So Ruth was in the lineage of Jesus Christ. Was all of this by chance? God often works through everyday tasks, activities, and personal decisions to accomplish His ultimate goals. So when we are faced with making a decision whether to do right or wrong, consider not just the present but the long-term certainties if we choose to walk in God's path. Ruth didn't know her future but she knew making a commitment of loyalty to Naomi and God was the right thing to do ... and she did it!
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Just as Boaz rescued Ruth and Naomi from an uncertain and a seemingly unfavorable future, God can change our uncertain future to one of salvation for those who have made a commitment to Him (Isaiah 59:20). In many ways, through the sacrifice of Jesus, God has done his part to buy us back (redeem us) from a life of sin. Now we must do our part and declare Jesus as our Lord and Savior who redeemed us through His blood on the cross. This is more than a verbal declaration; our actions should show that we mean what we say.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Isaiah 59:15-21 . When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




August 9 – A Choice to be Just
Alternate Title – Doing Justice

Bible Lesson: Jeremiah 7:1-15 

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

My brother used to have a saying, "It's your world. I am just living in it." While his statement was meant as a flippant greeting, in reality it really describes our status on earth. It is God's world, and we are just living in it. In Jeremiah 7:3, God spoke through the prophet and gave the Israelites a serious command, "...Reform your ways and your actions, and I will let you live in this place." We should often remind ourselves, we are living at God's pleasure (It's His world. We are just living in it!) Anything and everything we have belongs to Him - even our life itself. When we die we will give up all our worldly possessions, and there will be no "U Haul" trailer behind the hearse, because we will not take those worldly things to where we go beyond death.

In our lesson, the prophet Jeremiah warned the people of Judah that God was not pleased with them and their sinful nature. When Jeremiah began his ministry around 627 BC, Judah was relatively prosperous and not under duress. They continued with normal everyday living; much as we are now doing in the United States. Jeremiah warned the people to not become complacent just because the Temple of God existed in their land. The existence of the Temple was no license to sin (Jer 7:4, 7:9) and they should not think the Lord would continue to protect them (Jer 7:8). In fact, God pronounced His patience was near an end and He would punish Judah (Jer 7:14) and the people would be sent into exile (Jer 7:15). But, even at that late hour, He said He would not take their land from them if they would repent and change their evil ways (Jer 7:3-4).

The Lord allowed Jeremiah to witness the punishment of Judah for their failure to heed the warnings. In 605 BC when Nebuchadnezzar became king of Babylon, things changed for Judah and God's punishment began with the Babylonian invasion. The king of Judah - Zedekiah - responded to Jeremiah's warnings by having him put in prison (Jer 32:2-3). Eventually, the Babylonian invasion resulted in the destruction of Jerusalem in 597 BC and the people lost their land as the prophecy had foretold. As for Jeremiah, he was released from prison by the Babylonians and allowed to continue to live in Judah (Jer 39:14).

In the game show, "Let's Make a Deal," the contestant usually has to make a choice between two items; not knowing what is hidden from view for at least one of the items. The game show host could say something like, "You can keep what is in the box or exchange it for what is behind curtain number 3." In the case of the Israelites, Jeremiah essentially told them what was in the box and what was behind the curtain. In the "box" was the sinful ways of the world and behind the "curtain" was God's favor if they obeyed Him. Today, many of us choose the sinful box because it is full of the things of the world which feel good to us and things we want to hold on to.

The words of Jeremiah are speaking to us today as if he was standing outside our gate preaching to us as we enter; warning us to change our sinful ways or face punishment. The question is, "Will we do a better job of heeding the warnings than did the people of Judah?"


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Jeremiah 7:1-15 . When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.




August 16 – A Call for Repentance
Alternate Title – The Error Of Our Ways

Bible Lesson: Ezekiel 18:1-13, 30-32 

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

Included in chapters 15 through 24 are a series of eight metaphors concerning the upcoming judgement and punishment of Jerusalem.

The metaphor of the sour grapes in chapter 18 starts with a proverb which says when the parents eat sour grapes, the children's mouths will pucker (Ezek 18:2). This means the children's generation is made to suffer due to the sins of the parents. God said, through Ezekiel, this proverb is wrong; He judges each person, children and parents, by their own actions (Ezek 18:4). Therefore, the future of the children is not necessarily written in stone due to sins of the parents.

With this knowledge, a fervent appeal is made to the Israelites to change their ways and repent before it is too late (Ezek 18:30). God let it be known He would much rather not punish them if they would only change their ways (Ezek 18:31-32).

Many of us who are now reading these words are doing something we know God doesn't want us to do. These words are telling us it is not too late to change and repent. Sins of the past do not dictate our future. Our past sins can be forgiven, through the sacrifice and blood of Jesus Christ.


The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Ezekiel 18:1-13 and 30-32. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.





August 23 – A Demand for Justice
Alternate Title – Making a Difference

Bible Lesson: Zechariah 7:8-14 

What we shall learn from the lesson Scripture:
(Pop-up references come from The New Living Translation courtesy of Reftagger.com)

Background: The temple built under King Solomon had been destroyed and the Israelites sent into exile by the Babylonians. Then Persians defeated the Babylonians and a remnant of the Israelites were allowed to return to Jerusalem.
They started to build a new temple, but stopped around 536 BC, after the foundation had been laid. After more than 15 years had passed, in 520 BC, God sent the prophet Haggai to challenge and motivate them to resume the temple construction. This happened just before the time Zechariah began his work as a prophet. God spoke through Zechariah to prepare the people to have the right attitude before worship began in the new temple that they were constructing. Once again, the Lord was committed to reward the people with blessings if they would be obedient.

Lesson: Genuine worship of God produces action and not just words; what we do, and not what we say is the only true indication of our obedience to Him. The reference scripture instructs the Israelites to judge fairly and show mercy and kindness to each other (Zech 7:9-10). In essence, they were told to learn from the mistakes of their ancestors who refused to abide by those instructions (Zech 7:11). Because of this disobedience, they had been punished (Zech 7:14).

Today, we should actively seek to help those who are less fortunate and not just focus on our own wellbeing or the wellbeing of our family. Our justice system should not be inclined to give preferential treatment to certain people while unfairly punishing others. This is what the Lord wants us to do, but all too often our actions do not support God's desires. Our world is far from perfect, for if we lived in a godly world, those in need would be taken care of, and our lives would be full of generosity and compassion. In such a world, we will not have mass murders, hate, and unfair treatment of others. The good news is one day there will be such a world; those who hate, treat others unfairly, and oppress people will not be a part of it. Jesus will usher in that new world when He comes a second time.

The Bible lesson link (at the beginning of the lesson) is for the King James Version. You may also wish to read the New Living Translation of Zechariah 7:8-14. When you get to the New Living Translation web site, scroll down the page a short distance to find the Scripture.


For access to all chapters of the King James Version Bible in audio and visual formats, visit
the Audio-Bible.com web site.

For other versions (NIV, New Living Translation, etc.) of the Bible in audio and visual formats, visit the World Wide Study Bible page of Christian Classics Eternal Library site. Also visit the New Living Translation web site.

Some information on this page may be referenced from the NLT Study Bible, the Wryer Study Bible (NIV), and the Standard Lesson Commentary. Frederick L. Marsh is the commentary author of the information contained in this page. The opinions expressed are his alone.



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